Before Using

Drug information provided by: IBM Micromedex

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of incobotulinumtoxinA in children with lower limb spasticity, cervical dystonia, blepharospasm, or glabellar frown lines. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of incobotulinumtoxinA in children 2 to 17 years of age with sialorrhea or upper limb spasms, excluding spasms caused by cerebral palsy. Safety and efficacy have not been established in children younger than 2 years of age.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of incobotulinumtoxinA in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more sensitive to the effects of this medicine than younger adults and are more likely to have side effects (eg, difficulty with swallowing, lack or loss of strength, or dizziness), which may require caution in patients receiving incobotulinumtoxinA.

Breastfeeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Drug Interactions

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Other Interactions

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease) or
  • Cornea or eye problems (eg, ulcers) or
  • Lambert-Eaton syndrome (nerve-muscle disorder) or
  • Motor neuropathy (muscle and nerve problem) or
  • Myasthenia gravis (severe muscle weakness) or
  • Surgery where the injection will be given (eg, eye or face surgery)—May increase risk for more serious side effects.
  • Breathing problems (eg, asthma, emphysema) or
  • Dysphagia (trouble with swallowing) or
  • Glaucoma, narrow angle or
  • Ptosis (droopy eyelid)—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
  • Infection at the injection site—Should not be used in patients with this condition.