Before Using

Drug information provided by: IBM Micromedex

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of colesevelam to lower high cholesterol levels in the blood in boys and in girls who have had their first menstrual period 10 years of age and older. However, safety and efficacy have not been established to lower high cholesterol levels in the blood in children younger than 10 years of age or in girls before having their first menstrual period and to lower high blood sugar levels in children with type 2 diabetes.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of colesevelam in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more sensitive to the effects of this medicine than younger adults.

Breastfeeding

Studies in women suggest that this medication poses minimal risk to the infant when used during breastfeeding.

Drug Interactions

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Bezafibrate
  • Deferasirox
  • Desogestrel
  • Dienogest
  • Drospirenone
  • Estradiol
  • Ethinyl Estradiol
  • Ethynodiol
  • Gestodene
  • Levonorgestrel
  • Mestranol
  • Mycophenolate Mofetil
  • Mycophenolic Acid
  • Nomegestrol
  • Norethindrone
  • Norgestimate
  • Norgestrel
  • Pravastatin

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Cyclosporine
  • Glimepiride
  • Glipizide
  • Glyburide
  • Levothyroxine
  • Metformin
  • Olmesartan Medoxomil
  • Phenytoin
  • Warfarin

Other Interactions

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Bowel blockage, history of or
  • Hypertriglyceridemia (high triglycerides or fatty acids in the blood), severe or
  • Pancreatitis (swelling of the pancreas) caused by hypertriglyceridemia, history of—Should not be used in patients with these conditions.
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis (high ketones and acid in the blood) or
  • Type 1 diabetes—Should not be used in patients with these conditions. Your doctor must give you insulin to treat these conditions.
  • Dysphagia (trouble swallowing) or
  • Esophageal blockage (problem with swallowing) or
  • Vitamin deficiency (eg, vitamin A, D, E, or K) or history of—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
  • Gastrointestinal motility disorder (eg, chronic constipation) or
  • Gastrointestinal surgery, major and recent (eg, colostomy) or
  • Gastroparesis (bowels move slowly) or
  • Malabsorption syndrome (food not absorbed in the stomach or bowels)—Use is not recommended. May cause side effects to become worse.
  • Phenylketonuria (PKU)—The powder for oral suspension contains phenylalanine, which can make this condition worse.

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