Precautions

Drug information provided by: IBM Micromedex

It is very important that your doctor check your or your child's progress at regular visits to make sure this medicine is working properly. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects.

You should not use this medicine together with dofetilide (Tikosyn®). Using these medicines together may cause serious or life-threatening side effects.

It is important to tell your doctor if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant before using this medicine. Using this medicine while you are pregnant can harm your unborn baby. If you are a woman who can get pregnant, your doctor may do tests to make sure you are not pregnant before starting treatment. Do not use this medicine during the first 12 weeks of your pregnancy unless your doctor tells you to. Use an effective form of birth control to keep from getting pregnant.

Serious allergic reactions may occur while taking this medicine. These usually occur within 6 weeks after the medicine is started, but may occur at any time. Check with your doctor right away if you or your child have a severe rash or rash with fever, blistering or peeling skin, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, joint or muscle pain, sores in the mouth, swelling of the face, trouble breathing, unusual tiredness or weakness, or yellow eyes or skin.

When you begin taking this medicine, you will be given a warning card which describes symptoms of severe allergic reactions that may be caused by Triumeq®. The warning card also provides information about how to treat these allergic reactions. For your safety, you should carry the warning card with you at all times.

If you must stop using this medicine because of an allergic reaction, you should never use the medicine again. Return the unused medicine to your doctor or pharmacist. A worse reaction, possibly even death, can occur if you use the medicine again. Tell your doctor right away if you have ever taken abacavir, especially if you have experienced an allergic reaction to it in the past.

Two rare but serious reactions to this medicine are lactic acidosis (too much acid in the blood) and liver toxicity, which includes an enlarged liver. These are more common if you are female, very overweight (obese), or have been taking anti-HIV medicines for a long time. Call your doctor right away if you have dark urine, decreased appetite, diarrhea, general feeling of discomfort, light-colored stools, muscle cramping or pain, nausea, stomach discomfort or cramping, unusual tiredness or weakness, trouble breathing, vomiting, or yellow eyes or skin.

Your immune system may get stronger when you start taking HIV medicines. Tell your doctor right away if you or your child notices any changes in your health. Sometimes the immune system will start to fight infections that were hidden in your body, such as pneumonia or tuberculosis. Autoimmune disorders (eg, Graves' disease, polymyositis, or Guillain-Barré syndrome) may also occur.

This medicine may cause you to have excess body fat. Tell your doctor right away if you notice changes in your body shape, including an increased amount of body fat in the neck or upper back, face, around the chest, or stomach area. You might also lose fat from your legs, arms, or face.

This medicine may increase your risk of having a heart attack. This is more likely if you smoke regularly or if you have diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol. Call your doctor right away if you have chest pain or discomfort, pain or discomfort in the arms, jaw, back or neck, nausea, sweating, or vomiting.

This medicine will not keep you from giving HIV to your partner during sex. Make sure you understand this and practice safe sex, even if your partner also has HIV, by using a latex condom or other barrier method. This medicine will also not keep you from giving HIV to other people if they are exposed to your blood. Do not re-use or share needles with anyone.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal (eg, St. John's wort) or vitamin supplements.