Infographic: Electrical Brain Stimulation for Epilepsy

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Electrical Brain Stimulation for Epilepsy

Epilepsy is a neurological disorder caused by abnormal brain activity leading to recurrent seizures.

3 million people in the U.S. suffer from epilepsy

  • 2/3 of people with epilepsy are seizure free with medication
  • 1/3 of people have drug resistant epilepsy and continue to have seizures despite taking medications
  • Many people with drug resistant epilepsy can be treated with surgery or brain stimulation devices

Electrical brain stimulation offers hope for those with drug resistant epilepsy.

Responsive neurostimulation (RNS) and deep brain stimulation (DBS) are two types approved by the FDA.

How RNS works:

  1. Implant electrodes:

    Electrodes are placed in the part of the brain where the abnormalities triggering seizures originate. The electrodes are used to deliver electricity to the brain.

  2. Implant pulse generator:

    Electrodes are connected to a pacemaker-like device in the skull.

  3. Generate electrical impulses:

    The pulse generator delivers electrical pulses in response to detected brain activity. Pulses are undetectable to the person and help suppress seizures. Generate electrical impulses

How DBS works:

  1. Implant electrodes:

    Electrodes are placed in the thalamus, a control center deep within the brain. The electrodes are used to deliver electricity to the brain.

  2. Implant pulse generator:

    Electrodes are connected to a pacemaker-like device in the chest.

  3. Generate electrical impulses:

    The pulse generator delivers continuous electrical pulses that are undetectable to the person and help manage brain activity and suppress seizures.

Electrical brain stimulation can change lives for the better.

Research has shown that brain stimulation can significantly reduce the number and severity of seizures. With fewer seizures, people can improve their quality of life and enjoy:

  • Freedom

    People will feel more comfortable and safer traveling.

  • Activity

    Limitations in activities and lifestyle can be improved.

  • Relationships

    People who might have avoided social outings due to seizures can interact more easily.

Source: MayoClinic.org

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