Ensuring screen time quality

Not all apps, online games or programs are created equal. To ensure quality screen time, consider these tips:

  • Preview programs, games and apps before allowing your child to view or play with them.
  • Seek out interactive options that engage your child, rather than those that just require pushing and swiping or staring at the screen.
  • Use parental controls to block or filter internet content.
  • Make sure your child is close by during screen time so that you can supervise his or her activities.
  • Ask your child regularly what programs, games and apps he or she has played with during the day.
  • Play a video game or explore a new app with your child.
  • When watching programming with your child, discuss what you're watching and educate him or her about advertising and commercials.

Seek out information from organizations such as Common Sense Media to help you determine if a program, game or app is appropriate.

Remember that at some point your child will be exposed to content that you haven't approved beforehand and devices without internet filters. Talk to your child about the possible situations that could come up and the behavior you expect.

Setting screen time limits for older children

Set reasonable limits for your child's screen time, especially if your child's use of screens is hindering his or her involvement in other activities. Consider these tips:

  • Prioritize unplugged, unstructured playtime.
  • Create tech-free zones or times, such as during mealtime or one night a week.
  • Discourage use of media entertainment during homework.
  • Set and enforce daily or weekly screen time limits and curfews, such as no exposure to devices or screens 1 hour before bedtime.
  • Consider using apps that control the length of time a child can use a device.
  • Require your children to charge their devices outside of their bedrooms at night.
  • Keep screens out of your child's bedroom.
  • Limit your own screen time.
  • Eliminate background TV.

Teaching appropriate behavior

Online relationships and social media have become a major part of adolescent life. Experts suggest that it's OK for your teen to be a part of these worlds — as long as he or she understands appropriate behavior. Explain to your teen what's OK and what's not OK, such as sexting, cyberbullying and sharing personal information online. Teach your child not to send or share anything online that he or she would not want the entire world to see for eternity. No matter how smart or mature you feel your child is, monitor his or her online and social media behavior.

Your child is bound to make mistakes using media. Talk to your child and help him or her learn from them. Also, model positive online etiquette yourself.

Managing your child's use of screens and media will be an ongoing challenge. But by developing household rules— and revisiting them as your child grows — you can help ensure a safe and fun experience.

Nov. 18, 2016 See more In-depth