Overview

Rabies is a deadly virus spread to people from the saliva of infected animals. The rabies virus is usually transmitted through a bite.

Animals most likely to transmit rabies in the United States include bats, coyotes, foxes, raccoons and skunks. In developing countries of Africa and Southeast Asia, stray dogs are the most likely to spread rabies to people.

Once a person begins showing signs and symptoms of rabies, the disease is nearly always fatal. For this reason, anyone who may have a risk of contracting rabies should receive rabies vaccines for protection.

Nov. 04, 2016
References
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  2. Longo DL, et al., eds. Rabies and other rhabdovirus infections. In: Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 19th ed. New York, N.Y.: McGraw-Hill Education; 2015. http://accessmedicine.com. Accessed Aug. 24, 2016.
  3. AskMayoExpert. Rabies. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.
  4. Rabies. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/rabies/. Accessed Aug. 24, 2016.
  5. Papadakis MA, et al., eds. Viral and rickettsial infections. In: Current Medical Diagnosis & Treatment 2017. 56th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2017. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Aug. 24, 2016.
  6. Rabies vaccine information statements. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/rabies.html. Accessed Aug. 24, 2016.