Preparing for your appointment

You're likely to start by seeing your primary care provider. If your doctor finds evidence of a pituitary tumor, he or she might recommend you see several specialists, such as a brain surgeon (neurosurgeon) or a doctor who specializes in disorders of the endocrine system (endocrinologist).

Here's some information to help you prepare for your appointment.

What you can do

When you make the appointment, ask if there's anything you need to do in advance, such as fasting before having a specific test. Make a list of:

  • Your symptoms, including any that may seem unrelated to the reason for your appointment
  • Key personal information, including major stresses or recent life changes and family medical history
  • Medications, vitamins or supplements you take, including doses
  • Questions to ask your doctor

Take a family member or friend along, if possible, to help you retain the information you receive.

For a pituitary tumor, questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What is likely causing my symptoms or condition?
  • What are other possible causes?
  • What specialists should I see?
  • What tests do I need?
  • What is the best course of action?
  • What are alternatives to the primary approach you're suggesting?
  • I have these other health conditions. How can I manage them together?
  • Are there restrictions I need to follow?
  • Are there brochures or other printed materials I can have? What websites do you recommend?

Don't hesitate to ask other questions.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, including:

  • When did your symptoms begin?
  • Have they been continuous or occasional?
  • How severe are your symptoms?
  • What, if anything, seems to improve your symptoms?
  • What, if anything, appears to worsen your symptoms?
Nov. 19, 2015
  1. Pituitary tumors information page. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Accessed Sept. 10, 2015.
  2. Pituitary tumors. American Cancer Society. Accessed Sept. 10, 2015.
  3. Snyder PJ. Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of gonadotroph and other clinically nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas. Accessed Sept. 10, 2015.
  4. Loeffler JS, et al. Radiation therapy of pituitary adenomas. Accessed Sept. 10, 2015.
  5. Martinkova J, et al. Impulse control disorders associated with dopaminergic medication in patients with pituitary adenomas. Clinical Neuropharmacology. 2011;34:179.
  6. Pituitary tumors treatment — for health professionals. National Cancer Institute. Accessed Sept. 11, 2015.