Precautions

المعلومات عن الأدوية مقدَّمة من: IBM Micromedex

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits. This will allow your doctor to see if the medicine is working properly and to decide if you should continue to take it. Blood and urine tests will be needed to check for unwanted effects.

Check with your doctor if you have used this medicine and have not had good relief. Also, check with your doctor if your migraine headaches are worse, or if they are occurring more often, than before you started using this medicine.

Using this medicine during the later part of a pregnancy can harm your unborn baby. If you think you have become pregnant while using this medicine, tell your doctor right away.

Do not take this medicine if you have used an MAO inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan®), phenelzine (Nardil®), selegiline (Eldepryl®), or tranylcypromine (Parnate®) within the past 2 weeks. Do not use this medicine if you have taken other migraine medicines (eg, almotriptan, frovatriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, zolmitriptan, Axert™, Frova®, Amerge®, Maxalt®, or Zomig®) or an ergotamine medicine (eg, dihydroergotamine, methysergide, Cafergot®, D.H.E. 45®, Ergomar®, or Migranal®) within the past 24 hours.

This medicine may cause problems if you have heart disease. If your doctor thinks you might have a problem with this medicine, he or she may want you to take your first dose in the doctor’s office or clinic.

This medicine may increase your risk of having a blood clot, heart attack, or stroke. This is more likely to occur if you or a family member already has a heart disease, if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, if you smoke, if you are male and over 40 years of age, or if you are female and have gone through menopause. People who use this medicine for a long time might also have a higher risk. Check with your doctor if you have chest pain, faintness, nausea, unusual sweating, trouble breathing, trouble seeing, or trouble speaking while using this medicine.

Check with your doctor right away if you have chest discomfort, jaw or neck tightness after using this medicine. Also, tell your doctor if you have sudden or severe stomach pain after taking this medicine.

This medicine might cause bleeding or ulcers in your stomach or intestines. This problem can happen without warning signs. This is more likely if you have had a stomach ulcer in the past, if you smoke or drink alcohol regularly, if you are over 60 years of age, are in poor health, or are using certain other medicines (eg, steroid medicine, blood thinner).

Do not use this medicine if you are also using other medicines containing naproxen. Using these medicines together may cause serious unwanted effects.

Make sure your doctor knows about all the medicines you are using. Sumatriptan and naproxen combination may cause a serious condition called serotonin syndrome when taken with some medicines. This especially includes medicines used to treat depression, including citalopram, duloxetine, escitalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, olanzapine, paroxetine, sertraline, venlafaxine, Celexa®, Lexapro®, Cymbalta®, Effexor®, Paxil®, Prozac®, or Zoloft®. Check with your doctor first before taking any other medicines.

Check with your doctor right away if you have bloody urine, a decrease in frequency or amount of urine, an increase in blood pressure, increased thirst, loss of appetite, lower back or side pain, nausea, swelling of the face, fingers, or lower legs, trouble breathing, unusual tiredness or weakness, vomiting, or weight gain. These could be symptoms of a serious kidney problem.

Hyperkalemia (high potassium in the blood) may occur while you are using this medicine. Check with your doctor right away if you have stomach pain, confusion, difficulty with breathing, irregular heartbeat, nausea or vomiting, nervousness, numbness or tingling in the hands, feet, or lips, or weakness or heaviness of the legs.

This medicine may cause serious allergic reaction called anaphylaxis, which can be life-threatening and requires medical attention. Although this is rare, it may occur more often in patients who are allergic to aspirin or to any of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Tell your doctor right away if you have a rash, itching, hoarseness, trouble breathing, trouble swallowing, or any swelling of your hands, face, or mouth after using this medicine.

Serious skin reactions, including exfoliative dermatitis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) may also occur during treatment with this medicine. Check with your doctor right away if you have black, tarry stools, blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin, chest pain, chills, cough, diarrhea, fever, itching, joint or muscle pain, painful or difficult urination, red irritated eyes, red skin lesions, sore throat, sores, ulcers, or white spots in the mouth or on the lips, swollen glands, unusual bleeding or bruising, or unusual tiredness or weakness.

Check with your doctor right away if you have any symptoms of liver problems, including dark-colored urine or pale stools, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, pain in your upper stomach, or yellowing of your skin or eyes.

If you are rapidly gaining weight, having trouble breathing, chest pain or discomfort, extreme tiredness or weakness, irregular breathing, irregular heartbeat, or excessive swelling of the hands, wrist, ankles, or feet, check with your doctor immediately. These may be symptoms of heart problems or your body keeping too much water.

Using too much of this medicine or any other migraine medicines (eg, ergotamine, triptans, opioids, or a combination treatment for 10 or more days per month) may worsen your headache. Talk to your doctor about this risk. It may also be helpful to note of how often your migraine attacks occur and how much medicines you use.

Check with your doctor immediately if blurred vision, difficulty in reading, or any other change in vision occurs during or after your treatment. Your eyes may need to be checked by an ophthalmologist (eye doctor).

Drinking alcoholic beverages can make headaches worse or cause new headaches to occur. People who suffer from severe headaches should probably avoid alcoholic beverages, especially during a headache.

This medicine may cause a delay in ovulation for women and may affect their ability to have children. If you plan to have children, talk with your doctor before using this medicine.

This medicine may cause some people to become dizzy, drowsy, or less alert than normal. If any of these side effects occur, do not drive, use machines, or do anything else that could be dangerous while you are dizzy or less alert.

Before you have any medical tests, tell the medical doctor in charge that you are taking this medicine. The results of some tests may be affected by this medicine.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.