Mayo Clinic's approach

Kidney transplant consultation at Mayo Clinic Kidney transplant consultation

Kidney transplant consultation at Mayo Clinic

Teamwork

At Mayo Clinic, an integrated team of doctors trained in kidney disease (nephrologists), abdominal transplant surgery, infectious disease management and other specialties is focused on the needs of you and your family. Surgeons, doctors, transplant nurses, pharmacists, social workers and others work together to manage every aspect of your kidney transplant, from planning through post-surgical care.

Health care professionals trained in many medical specialties work together as a team to ensure favorable outcomes from your kidney transplant. Care team roles

Health care professionals trained in many medical specialties work together as a team to ensure favorable outcomes from your kidney transplant.

Coordinated care

Having all of this subspecialized expertise in a single place, focused on you, means that you're not just getting one opinion — your care is discussed among the team, your test results are available quickly, appointments are scheduled in coordination and your transplant care team works together to determine what's best for you.

Surgical expertise

Mayo Clinic surgeons perform more than 600 kidney transplants a year, including numerous complex surgical procedures at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. As a three-site institution, Mayo Clinic has one of the largest living-donor kidney transplant and paired kidney donor programs in the United States.

Our experts have pioneered many procedures, including living-donor kidney transplants and kidney transplant before dialysis is needed. The Mayo Clinic kidney transplant team has extensive experience in the most complex types of kidney transplantation, including ABO incompatible, positive crossmatch and paired donation kidney transplants.

Health History Questionnaire

Interested in being a living kidney or liver donor? Start the process by completing a Health History Questionnaire.

Pediatric kidney transplant surgery is also provided to children at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and Scottsdale/Phoenix, Ariz.

Mayo Clinic also offers kidney transplants to select candidates with hepatitis B and C and treated HIV.

Kidney transplant outcomes at Mayo Clinic compare favorably with the national average.

Research

Researchers at Mayo Clinic are actively engaged in developing new technologies, treatments and techniques to make transplants safer and available to more people.

Mayo Clinic researchers were part of a major U.S. study that pioneered a new pre-transplant immune system treatment to expand the use of incompatible living-donor kidney transplants — an innovation that means less time on dialysis waiting for a perfect match for many people whose immune systems previously wouldn't tolerate a living-donor kidney.

At Mayo Clinic, you may have access to ongoing clinical trials, research and new treatments.

Nationally recognized expertise

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., has been recognized as the best Nephrology hospital in the nation for 2017-2018 by U.S. News & World Report.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for diabetes and endocrinology in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings. Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., is ranked highly performing for diabetes and endocrinology by U.S. News & World Report.

Aug. 15, 2017
References
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