Volumes and outcomes

 

Mayo Clinic doctors' experience and integrated team approach result in transplant outcomes that compare favorably with national averages. Teams work with transplant recipients before, during and after surgery to ensure the greatest likelihood of superior results.

Volumes and statistics are maintained separately for the three Mayo Clinic locations. Taken together or separately, transplant patients at Mayo Clinic enjoy excellent results.

Volumes

Arizona

A total of 230 kidney transplants were performed at Mayo Clinic in Arizona in 2011, including 113 living donor transplants. Nearly 1,600 kidney transplants have been performed since the program began in 1999.

Florida

Mayo Clinic in Florida has performed more than 950 kidney transplants in adults since the program began in April 2000. Transplants are done at Mayo Clinic hospital.

Minnesota

Surgeons at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota have completed more than 4,570 kidney transplants since 1963. Since 1999, more than 296 of the kidney transplants were in combination with heart, liver or pancreas transplants.

Mayo Clinic in Minnesota surgeons have performed more than 2,915 living donor kidney transplants since 1963 and more than 1,654 deceased donor kidney transplants since 1967.

Success Measures

Kidney Transplant Patient Survival — Adult

Kidney Transplant Patient Survival — Adult from Deceased Donor

Kidney Transplant Patient Survival — Adult from Living Donor

Kidney Transplant Patient Survival — Children

Kidney Transplant Patient Survival — Child from Deceased Donor

Kidney Transplant Patient Survival — Child from Living Donor

Kidney Donor Organ (Graft) Survival — Adult

Kidney Donor Organ (Graft) Survival — Adult from Deceased Donor

Kidney Donor Organ (Graft) Survival — Adult from Living Donor

Kidney Donor Organ (Graft) Survival — Children

Kidney Donor Organ (Graft) Survival — Child from Deceased Donor

Kidney Donor Organ (Graft) Survival — Child from Living Donor

Kidney/Pancreas Transplant Patient Survival — Adult

July 14, 2016
References
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  2. U.S. News & World Report. U.S. News Best Hospitals 2015-16. http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/rankings. Accessed Feb. 22, 2016.
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  4. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 5, 2016.
  5. Schinstock CA (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 18, 2014.
  6. Lallas CD, et al. The development of a laparoscopic donor nephrectomy program in a de novo renal transplant program: Evolution of technique and results in over 200 cases. Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons. 2006;10:135.
  7. Mai ML (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Fla. April 26, 2016.
  8. Stulak JM, et al. Combined heart and abdominal organ transplantation: Excellent outcomes gained from a unique experience. Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation. 2014;33:S278.
  9. Li H, et al. Assessing the efficacy of kidney paired donation — Performance of an integrated three-site program. Transplantation. 2014;98:300.
  10. Cornell LD, et al. Positive crossmatch kidney transplant recipients treated with eculizumab: Outcomes beyond 1 year. American Journal of Transplantation. 2015;15:1293.
  11. Shapiro R, et al. Benefits and complications of laparoscopic donor nephrectomy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 11, 2016.
  12. Polycystic kidney disease. National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases. http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/polycystic/. Accessed March 16, 2016.
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  23. Rossi AP, et al. Evaluation of the potential renal transplant recipient. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 6, 2016.
  24. Cramer CH II (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 27, 2016.
  25. Li H, et al. The limits of paired donation — Who doesn't get transplanted? American Journal of Transplantation. 2013;13(suppl 5). http://www.atcmeetingsabstracts.com/abstract/limits-of-paired-donation-who-doesn’t-get-transplanted-the/. Accessed April 27, 2016.
  26. Crespo HS, et al. Kidney transplantation in the septuagenarian. American Journal of Transplantation. 2015;15(suppl 3). http://www.atcmeetingabstracts.com/abstract/kidney-transplantation-in-the-septuagenarian/. Accessed April 27, 2016.
  27. Taner T, et al. Decreased chronic cellular and antibody-mediated injury in the kidney following simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation. Kidney International. 2016:89:909.