Overview

Colposcopy (kol-POS-kuh-pee) is a procedure to closely examine your cervix, vagina and vulva for signs of disease. During colposcopy, your doctor uses a special instrument called a colposcope.

Your doctor may recommend colposcopy if your Pap test result is abnormal. If your doctor finds an unusual area of cells during colposcopy, a sample of tissue can be collected for laboratory testing (biopsy).

Many women experience anxiety before their colposcopy exams. Knowing what to expect during your colposcopy may help you feel more comfortable.

June 02, 2017
References
  1. Colposcopy. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. http://www.acog.org/~/media/For%20Patients/faq135.pdf?dmc=1&ts=20140106T1656517997. Accessed Nov. 11, 2016.
  2. Feltmate CM, et al. Colposcopy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 11, 2016.
  3. Lobo RA, et al. Intraepithelial neoplasia of the lower genital tract (cervix, vagina, vulva): Etiology, screening, diagnosis, management. In: Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 11, 2016.
  4. Allen RH, et al. Pain relief for obstetric and gynecologic ambulatory procedures. Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America. 2013;40:625.
  5. Pfenninger JL, et al. Colposcopic examination. In: Pfenninger and Fowler's Procedures for Primary Care. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2011. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 11, 2016.
  6. Bosgraaf RP, et al. Qualitative insights into the psychological stress before and during colposcopy: A focus group study. Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2013:34:150.