Why it's done

Your doctor may recommend colposcopy if a Pap test or pelvic exam revealed abnormalities.

Colposcopy can be used to diagnose:

  • Genital warts
  • Inflammation of the cervix (cervicitis)
  • Precancerous changes in the tissue of the cervix
  • Precancerous changes in the tissue of the vagina
  • Precancerous changes of the vulva
June 02, 2017
References
  1. Colposcopy. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. http://www.acog.org/~/media/For%20Patients/faq135.pdf?dmc=1&ts=20140106T1656517997. Accessed Nov. 11, 2016.
  2. Feltmate CM, et al. Colposcopy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 11, 2016.
  3. Lobo RA, et al. Intraepithelial neoplasia of the lower genital tract (cervix, vagina, vulva): Etiology, screening, diagnosis, management. In: Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 11, 2016.
  4. Allen RH, et al. Pain relief for obstetric and gynecologic ambulatory procedures. Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America. 2013;40:625.
  5. Pfenninger JL, et al. Colposcopic examination. In: Pfenninger and Fowler's Procedures for Primary Care. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2011. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 11, 2016.
  6. Bosgraaf RP, et al. Qualitative insights into the psychological stress before and during colposcopy: A focus group study. Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2013:34:150.