Precautions

Drug information provided by: Micromedex

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to allow changes in your dose and to check for any unwanted effects.

Do not take this medicine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor (e.g. phenelzine [Nardil®] or tranylcypromine [Parnate®]) in the past 2 weeks.

Do not stop taking this medicine without first checking with your doctor. Your doctor may want you to gradually reduce the amount you are taking before stopping completely.

Check with your doctor right away if you are having convulsions (seizures); difficulty with breathing; a fast heartbeat; a high fever; high or low blood pressure; increased sweating; loss of bladder control; severe muscle stiffness; unusually pale skin; or tiredness. These could be symptoms of a serious condition called neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS).

This medicine may cause dizziness, trouble in controlling movements, or trouble in concentrating or seeing clearly. Make sure you know how you react to this medicine before you drive, use machines, or do other jobs that require you to be alert, well-coordinated, or able to think or see well.

Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting may occur with this medicine, especially when you get up from a lying or sitting position suddenly. These symptoms are more likely to occur when you begin taking this medicine, or when the dose is increased. Getting up slowly may also help. If this problem continues or gets worse, check with your doctor.

This medicine may cause diarrhea, and in some cases it can be severe. It can occur months after starting this medicine. Do not take any medicine to treat diarrhea without first checking with your doctor. Diarrhea medicines may make the diarrhea worse or make it last longer. If you have any questions about this or if mild diarrhea continues or gets worse, check with your doctor.

If you develop any unusual or strange thoughts and behavior while receiving this medicine, be sure to discuss it with your doctor. Other changes might be confusion, worsening of depression, visual hallucinations (seeing things that are not there), suicidal thoughts, and unusual excitement, nervousness, or irritability.

Check with your doctor right away if you have dark-colored urine, fever, muscle cramps or spasms, muscle pain or stiffness, or unusual tiredness or weakness. These may be symptoms of a condition called rhabdomyolysis.

Stop using this medicine and check with your doctor right away if you are having shortness of breath, chest tightness, or any type of breathing problem while being treated with this medicine.

It is important that your doctor check your skin regularly for signs of a skin cancer called melanoma. If you notice any unusual red, brown, or black spots on your skin, talk to your doctor right away.

It is possible that a dark color (red, brown, or black) may appear in saliva, urine, or sweat after taking this medicine. The color may cause some of your garments to become discolored. This is normal and nothing to worry about.

It is possible that you may become nauseous, especially when you are first starting your medicine.

Some people who have used this medicine had unusual changes in their behavior. Talk with your doctor right away if you start having problems with gambling or an increased interest in sex while using this medicine.

Before you have any medical tests, tell the medical doctor in charge that you are taking this medicine. The results of some tests may be affected by this medicine.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.