Your doctor can usually diagnose seborrheic keratosis by inspecting the growth. He or she might recommend removing the tissue so it can be examined under a microscope.

Oct. 13, 2016
  1. Seborrheic keratosis. American Academy of Dermatology. https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/bumps-and-growths/seborrheic-keratoses. Accessed June 16, 2016.
  2. Seborrheic keratoses. American Osteopathic College of Dermatology. http://www.aocd.org/?page=SeborrheicKeratoses. Accessed June 17, 2016.
  3. Roh NK, et al. Clinical and histopathological investigation of seborrheic keratosis. Annals of Dermatology. 2016;28:152.
  4. Goldstein BG, et al. Overview of benign lesions of the skin. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 17, 2016.
  5. Phulari RGS, et al. Seborrheic keratosis. Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology. 2014;18:327.
  6. Goldsmith LA, et al., eds. Benign neoplasms and hyperplasias. In: Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine. 8th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2012. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed June 18, 2016.