Self-management

Lifestyle and home remedies

You can treat most ingrown toenails at home. Here's how:

  • Soak your feet in warm water. Do this for 15 to 20 minutes three to four times a day. Soaking reduces swelling and relieves tenderness.
  • Place cotton or dental floss under your toenail. After each soaking, put fresh bits of cotton or waxed dental floss under the ingrown edge. This will help the nail grow above the skin edge.
  • Apply antibiotic cream. Put antibiotic ointment on the tender area and bandage the toe.
  • Choose sensible footwear. Consider wearing open-toed shoes or sandals until your toe feels better.
  • Take pain relievers. Over-the-counter pain relievers such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) and naproxen sodium (Aleve) may help ease the toe pain.

Prevention

To help prevent an ingrown toenail:

  • Trim your toenails straight across. Don't curve your nails to match the shape of the front of your toe. If you have your toenails done at a salon, be sure to tell your pedicurist to trim your nails straight across. If you have a condition that causes poor blood flow to your feet and you can't trim your nails, see a podiatrist regularly to have your nails trimmed.
  • Keep toenails at a moderate length. Trim toenails so they're even with the tips of your toes. If you trim your toenails too short, the pressure from your shoes on your toes may direct a nail to grow into the tissue.
  • Wear shoes that fit properly. Shoes that place too much pressure on your toes or pinch them may cause a nail to grow into surrounding tissue. If you have nerve damage to your feet, you may not be able to sense if your shoes fit too tightly. Take care to buy and wear properly fitted shoes, preferably from a shoe store specializing in fitting shoes for people with foot problems.
  • Wear protective footwear. If your work puts you at risk of injuring your toes, wear protective footwear, such as steel-toed shoes.
  • Check your feet. If you have diabetes, check your feet daily for signs of ingrown toenails or other foot problems.
Dec. 02, 2016
References
  1. Ingrown toenail. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=a00154. Accessed Oct. 25, 2016.
  2. Foot care. American Diabetes Association. http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/foot-complications/foot-care.html. Accessed Oct. 25, 2016.
  3. Tintinalli JE, et al. Soft tissue problems of the foot. In: Tintinalli's Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide. 8th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw Hill Companies; 2016. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Oct. 26, 2016.
  4. Eekhof JAH, et al. Interventions for ingrowing toenails. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. http://ovidsp.tx.ovid.com/sp-3.22.1b/ovidweb.cgi &S=NHNEFPAFGDDDLOEFNCHKAGOBEOBCAA00&Complete+Reference=S.sh.18%7c1%7c1. Accessed Oct. 29, 2016.
  5. Canale ST, et al. Disorders of nails and skin. In: Campbells Operative Orthopaedics. 12th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2013. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Oct. 29, 2016.
  6. Goldsmith LA, et al., eds. Biology of nails and nail disorders. In: Fitzpatricks Dermatology in General Medicine. 8th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2012. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Oct. 29, 2016.
  7. Living with diabetes: Foot complications. American Diabetes Association. http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/foot-complications/. Accessed Oct. 29, 2016.
  8. Goldstein BG, et al. Paronychia and ingrown toenails. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Oct. 29, 2016.