Frontotemporal dementia care at Mayo Clinic

Your Mayo Clinic care team

Teamwork

At Mayo Clinic, an integrated team of doctors trained in nervous system conditions (neurologists), nervous system and mental health conditions (neuropsychologists), nervous system conditions and radiology (neuroradiologists), speech and language (speech-language pathologists), sleep medicine, and physical medicine and rehabilitation collaborate to evaluate and treat frontotemporal dementia.

Extensive experience

Mayo Clinic doctors evaluate and treat more than 200 people with frontotemporal dementia each year.

Cutting-edge research

Mayo Clinic researchers study risk factors, diagnostic techniques and treatment options for frontotemporal dementia and other conditions. You may be eligible to participate in clinical trials and studies in the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center.

National recognition

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., is ranked among the Best Hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery and for rehabilitation by U.S. News & World Report.

Expertise and rankings

  • Experience. Every year, Mayo Clinic doctors diagnose and treat hundreds of people with frontotemporal dementia.
  • Collaboration. At Mayo Clinic, doctors trained in a variety of specialties, including nervous system conditions (neurologists), nervous system and mental health conditions (neuropsychologists), nervous system conditions and radiology (neuroradiologists), speech and language (speech-language pathologists), and others will work together to evaluate and treat frontotemporal dementia.
  • Individual treatment. Your doctor will tailor your treatment programs to your needs. Frontotemporal dementia can't be cured, but your treatment team can help you manage your condition.
  • Nationally recognized dementia research. Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's research at the Minnesota and Florida campuses are designated and funded by the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health. In addition, Mayo Clinic's Arizona campus is part of the Arizona Alzheimer's Consortium, a statewide research collaboration.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., is ranked among the Best Hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery and for rehabilitation by U.S. News & World Report.

Learn more about Mayo Clinic's neurology department's expertise and rankings.

Locations, travel and lodging

Mayo Clinic has major campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona; Jacksonville, Florida; and Rochester, Minnesota. The Mayo Clinic Health System has dozens of locations in several states.

For more information on visiting Mayo Clinic, choose your location below:

Costs and insurance

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people.

In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals, or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.

Learn more about appointments at Mayo Clinic.

Please contact your insurance company to verify medical coverage and to obtain any needed authorization prior to your visit. Often, your insurer's customer service number is printed on the back of your insurance card.

Oct. 29, 2016
References
  1. Frontotemporal disorders. National Institute of Aging. https://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/publication/frontotemporal-disorders/introduction. Accessed Sept. 16, 2016.
  2. Burrell JR, et al. The frontotemporal dementia-motor neuron disease continuum. The Lancet. 2016;388:919.
  3. Frontotemporal disorders. The Alzheimer's Association. http://www.alz.org/dementia/fronto-temporal-dementia-ftd-symptoms.asp. Accessed Sept. 17, 2016.
  4. Goldman L, et al., eds. Alzheimer disease and other dementias. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Sept. 17, 2016.
  5. Lee SE, et al. Frontotemporal dementia: Clinical features and diagnosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 16, 2016.
  6. Warren JD, et al. Frontotemporal dementia. BMJ. 2013;347:1.
  7. Weishaupt JH, et al. Common molecular pathways in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. Trends in Molecular Medicine. 2016;22:769.
  8. Lee SE, et al. Frontotemporal dementia: Treatment. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 16, 2016.
  9. Caceres CA, et al. Family caregivers of patients with frontotemporal dementia: An integrative review. International Journal of Nursing Studies. 2016;55:71.
  10. Neurological diagnostic tests and procedures. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/misc/diagnostic_tests.htm. Accessed Sept. 20, 2016.
  11. Larson EB. Evaluation of cognitive impairment and dementia. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 20, 2016.
  12. Riggin EA. AllScripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. June 28, 2016.
  13. Alzheimer's disease research centers. National Institute on Aging. https://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/alzheimers-disease-research-centers. Accessed Sept. 19, 2016.
  14. Participating institutions. Arizona Alzheimer's Research Consortium. http://azalz.org/about-us/participating-institutions/. Accessed Sept. 19, 2016.