Egg allergy reactions vary from person to person and usually occur soon after exposure to egg. Egg allergy symptoms can include:

  • Skin inflammation or hives — the most common egg allergy reaction
  • Nasal congestion, runny nose and sneezing (allergic rhinitis)
  • Digestive symptoms, such as cramps, nausea and vomiting
  • Asthma signs and symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, chest tightness or shortness of breath

Anaphylaxis

A severe allergic reaction can lead to anaphylaxis, a life-threatening emergency that requires an immediate epinephrine (adrenaline) shot and a trip to the emergency room. Anaphylaxis signs and symptoms include:

  • Constriction of airways, including a swollen throat or a lump in your throat that makes it difficult to breathe
  • Abdominal pain and cramping
  • Rapid pulse
  • Shock, with a severe drop in blood pressure felt as dizziness, lightheadedness or loss of consciousness

Discuss with your doctor any reaction — no matter how mild — you or your child has to eggs. The severity of egg allergy reactions can vary each time one occurs, so even if a past reaction was mild, the next one could be more serious.

If your doctor thinks you or your child may be at risk of a severe reaction, he or she may prescribe an emergency epinephrine shot to be used if anaphylaxis occurs. The shot comes in a device that makes it easy to deliver, called an autoinjector.

When to see a doctor

See a doctor if you or your child has signs or symptoms of a food allergy shortly after eating eggs or an egg-containing product. If possible, see the doctor when the allergic reaction is occurring. This may help in making a diagnosis.

If you or your child has signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis, seek immediate emergency treatment and use an autoinjector if one has been prescribed.

Jan. 27, 2015