Comparing inhaler types

Choosing the asthma inhaler that best meets your needs depends on several factors, including method of delivery and the type of medication you need. Some medications are available only with certain inhaler types. The chart below can help you understand the pros and cons of each type.

Asthma inhaler features
Metered dose inhaler Metered dose inhaler with a spacer Dry powder inhaler
Small and convenient to carry. Less convenient to carry than a metered dose inhaler without a spacer. Small and convenient to carry.
Doesn't require a deep, fast, inhaled breath. Doesn't require a deep, fast, inhaled breath. Requires a deep, fast, inhaled breath.
Accidently breathing out a little isn't a problem. Accidently breathing out a little isn't a problem. Accidently breathing out a little can blow away the medication.
Some inhalers require coordinating your breath with medication release. A spacer makes it easier to coordinate your breath with medication release. Doesn't require coordinating your breath with medication release.
Can result in medication on the back of your throat and tongue. Less medication settles on the back of your throat and tongue. Can result in medication on the back of your throat and tongue.
Some models don't show how many doses remain. Some models don't show how many doses remain. It's clear when the device is running out of medication.
Requires shaking and priming. Requires shaking and priming and correct use of the spacer. Single-dose models require loading capsules for each use.
Humidity doesn't affect medication. Humidity doesn't affect medication. High humidity can cause medication to clump.
Use of a cocking device generally isn't necessary. Use of a cocking device generally isn't necessary. May require dexterity to use a cocking device.

Other devices

Some people can't use a standard metered dose inhaler or dry powder inhaler. Other types include:

  • Metered dose inhaler with a face mask. Generally used for infants or small children, this type uses a standard metered dose inhaler with a spacer. The face mask, which attaches to the spacer, fits over the nose and mouth to make sure the right dose of medication reaches the lungs.
  • Nebulizer. This device turns asthma medication into a fine mist breathed in through a mouthpiece or mask worn over the nose and mouth. A nebulizer is generally used for people who can't use an inhaler, such as infants, young children, people who are very ill or people who need large doses of medication.
  • Soft mist inhaler

Work with your doctor to determine which type of inhaler will work best for you. Have your doctor, pharmacist or other health provider show you how to use it.

Using your inhaler correctly is critical in ensuring you get the correct dose of medication to keep your asthma under control. Talk to your doctor if you're having trouble using your inhaler, or it seems like you're not getting enough medication.

Replace your inhaler if it has passed its expiration date or it shows that all the doses have been used.

June 30, 2017 See more In-depth