Overview

Age spots — also called liver spots and solar lentigines — are small dark areas on your skin. They vary in size and usually appear on the face, hands, shoulders and arms — areas most exposed to the sun.

Age spots are very common in adults older than 50. But younger people can get them too, especially if they spend a lot of time in the sun.

Age spots can look like cancerous growths. But true age spots are harmless and don't need treatment. For cosmetic reasons, age spots can be lightened with skin-bleaching products or removed.

You can help prevent age spots by regularly using sunscreen and avoiding the sun.

April 14, 2017
References
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