Treatments and drugs

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Adenomyosis usually goes away after menopause, so treatment may depend on how close you are to that stage of life.

Treatment options for adenomyosis include:

  • Anti-inflammatory drugs. If you're nearing menopause, your doctor may have you try anti-inflammatory medications, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others), to control the pain. By starting an anti-inflammatory medicine two to three days before your period begins and continuing to take it during your period, you can reduce menstrual blood flow and help relieve pain.
  • Hormone medications. Combined estrogen-progestin birth control pills or hormone-containing patches or vaginal rings may lessen heavy bleeding and pain associated with adenomyosis. Progestin-only contraception, such as an intrauterine device, or continuous-use birth control pills often lead to amenorrhea — the absence of your menstrual periods — which may provide symptom relief.
  • Hysterectomy. If your pain is severe and menopause is years away, your doctor may suggest surgery to remove your uterus (hysterectomy). Removing your ovaries isn't necessary to control adenomyosis.
April 02, 2015

You Are ... The Campaign for Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization. Make a difference today.