Research

Mayo Clinic scientists, doctors and surgeons develop lung transplant insights and innovations that make transplants safer and available to more people. They conduct laboratory studies, clinical trials and other research on many aspects of lung transplantation, such as:

  • Improving outcomes. Mayo Clinic researchers study how frail people fair after transplant. The results could lead to interventions before surgery to improve patients' survival and outcomes. Researchers also studied how, for some people, losing weight before lung transplant surgery can reduce the risk of death and complications.
  • Making more donor lungs usable. Mayo Clinic is part of a multicenter trial of ex vivo lung perfusion, a process that reconditions donor lungs that previously would've been considered too damaged to use. This technique makes more lungs available to the people on the donor waiting list. Mayo Clinics has completed five lung transplants during this trial.
  • Cell therapies for lung disease. Mayo Clinic researchers study potential ways of using stem cell therapy, or regenerative medicine, to treat many lung conditions. Researchers study many areas of lung regeneration, including studying how reprogrammed stem cells can be turned into specialized cells that can replace, repair or regenerate diseased lung cells.

Mayo Clinic's researchers often collaborate with colleagues throughout the United States and internationally who are committed to improving outcomes and care for people with lung diseases.

You may have the opportunity to participate in clinical trials. Read more about the many lung transplant research studies supported by the Transplant Research Center.

Lung subspecialty laboratories

Publications

See a list of publications by Mayo Clinic authors on lung transplantation on PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine.

Watch Mark Stegall, M.D., and Richard Daly, M.D., discuss lowering rejection risk in organ transplants.

Regenerative medicine has the potential to provide innovative new therapies for people with lung diseases.

Research Profiles

Narrow Your Search

Feb. 14, 2017
References
  1. Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. http://www.srtr.org/default.aspx. Accessed July 14, 2016.
  2. U.S. News Best Hospitals 2015-16. U.S. News & World Report. http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/rankings. Accessed Feb. 22, 2016.
  3. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. June 22, 2016.
  4. Erasmus DB (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Fla. August 3, 2016.
  5. AskMayoExpert. Lung transplantation. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.
  6. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. About your lung transplant. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2006.
  7. Hachem RR. Lung transplantation: General guidelines for recipient selection. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed July 15, 2016.
  8. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. Planning for your transplant: A financial guide. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2009.
  9. Sherman W, et al. Lung transplantation and coronary artery disease. The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 2011;92:303.
  10. What is coronary angiography? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/ca/. Accessed July 15, 2016.
  11. What is a tracheostomy? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/trach/. Accessed July 15, 2016.
  12. What is a lung transplant? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/lungtxp/. Accessed July 15, 2016.
  13. Wilson ME, et al. Pretransplant frailty is associated with decreased survival after lung transplantation. The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation. 2016;35:173.
  14. Chandrashekaran S, et al. Weight loss prior to lung transplantation is associated with improved survival. The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation. 2015;34:651.
  15. Aho JM, et al. Closure of a recurrent bronchopleural fistula using a matrix seeded with patient-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Stem Cells Translational Medicine. 2016;5:1. http://www.stemcellstm.com. Accessed July l5, 2016.
  16. Single-lung transplant patient discharged. Mayovox. August 1990;37:9.
  17. Halum SL. A multi-institutional analysis of tracheotomy complications. Laryngoscope. 2012;122:38.