Eligibility

People with serious lung diseases who meet certain criteria of lung function are most appropriately treated with a lung transplant. The traditional age limit for lung transplantation is 65 years. At Mayo Clinic, however, we will evaluate individuals older than 65 who do not have significant disease processes besides their lung diseases.

People who need a lung transplant may have any of several serious lung diseases, including:

Besides lung transplant, Mayo Clinic specialists offer other treatment options for lung conditions and individualize the treatment to each person's needs.

Your transplant team will evaluate you to determine whether a lung transplant may be safe and beneficial for you. Your comprehensive evaluation will include lung function tests, blood tests, imaging scans and other tests. Doctors will check you for other serious conditions, including chronic infections, cancer, and heart and blood vessel (cardiovascular) disease.

Most people who are evaluated are determined to be eligible for a lung transplant. Your doctors and transplant team will work with you to promote wellness, lower your risks and improve your outcome after transplant. A care team member will talk with you about the importance of taking your anti-rejection (immunosuppressant) medications to keep your body from rejecting your lung.

April 20, 2017
References
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