Diagnosis

The diagnosis is made based on the medical history and physical examination. During the exam, your doctor will check for areas of tenderness in your foot. Where your pain is situated can help determine its cause.

Imaging tests

Usually no tests are necessary. Your doctor might suggest an X-ray or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to make sure your pain isn't being caused by another problem, such as a stress fracture or a pinched nerve.

Sometimes an X-ray shows a spur of bone projecting forward from the heel bone. In the past, these bone spurs were often blamed for heel pain and removed surgically. But many people who have bone spurs on their heels have no heel pain.

Treatment

Most people who have plantar fasciitis recover with conservative treatments, including resting, icing the painful area and stretching, in several months.

Medications

Pain relievers such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) and naproxen sodium (Aleve) can ease the pain and inflammation associated with plantar fasciitis.

Therapies

Stretching and strengthening exercises or use of specialized devices may provide symptom relief. These include:

  • Physical therapy. A physical therapist can instruct you in a series of exercises to stretch the plantar fascia and Achilles tendon and to strengthen lower leg muscles, which stabilize your ankle and heel. A therapist might also teach you to apply athletic taping to support the bottom of your foot.
  • Night splints. Your physical therapist or doctor might recommend that you wear a splint that stretches your calf and the arch of your foot while you sleep. This holds the plantar fascia and Achilles tendon in a lengthened position overnight and facilitates stretching.
  • Orthotics. Your doctor might prescribe off-the-shelf or custom-fitted arch supports (orthotics) to help distribute pressure to your feet more evenly.

Surgical or other procedures

When more-conservative measures aren't working after several months, your doctor might recommend:

  • Injections. Injecting a type of steroid medication into the tender area can provide temporary pain relief. Multiple injections aren't recommended because they can weaken your plantar fascia and possibly cause it to rupture. More recently, platelet-rich plasma has been used, under ultrasound guidance, to provide pain relief with less risk of tissue rupture.
  • Extracorporeal shock wave therapy. In this procedure, sound waves are directed at the area of heel pain to stimulate healing. It's usually used for chronic plantar fasciitis that hasn't responded to more-conservative treatments. This procedure might cause bruising, swelling, pain, numbness or tingling. Some studies show promising results, but it hasn't been shown to be consistently effective.
  • Tenex procedure. This minimally invasive procedure removes the scar tissue of plantar fasciitis without surgery.
  • Surgery. Few people need surgery to detach the plantar fascia from the heel bone. It's generally an option only when the pain is severe and all else fails. Side effects include a weakening of the arch in your foot.

Lifestyle and home remedies

To reduce the pain of plantar fasciitis, try these self-care tips:

  • Maintain a healthy weight. Lose weight if you're overweight or obese to minimize stress on your plantar fascia.
  • Choose supportive shoes. Avoid high heels. Buy shoes with a low to moderate heel, good arch support and shock absorbency. Don't go barefoot, especially on hard surfaces.
  • Don't wear worn-out athletic shoes. Replace your old athletic shoes before they stop supporting and cushioning your feet. If you're a runner, buy new shoes after about 400 to 500 miles of use.
  • Change your sport. Try a low-impact sport, such as swimming or bicycling, instead of walking or jogging.
  • Apply ice. Hold a cloth-covered ice pack over the area of pain for 15 to 20 minutes three or four times a day or after activity. Or try ice massage. Freeze a water-filled paper cup and roll it over the site of discomfort for about five to seven minutes. Regular ice massage can help reduce pain and inflammation.
  • Stretch your arches. Simple home exercises can stretch your plantar fascia, Achilles tendon and calf muscles.

Preparing for your appointment

While you may initially consult your family physician, he or she may refer you to a doctor who specializes in foot disorders or sports medicine.

What you can do

You may want to write a list that includes:

  • Your symptoms, and when they started
  • Key personal information, including your and your family's medical history and activities you do that could have contributed to your symptoms
  • All the medications, vitamins or other supplements you take, including doses
  • Questions to ask the doctor

For plantar fasciitis, basic questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What's likely causing my symptoms?
  • Other than the most likely cause, what are other possible causes for my symptoms?
  • What tests do I need?
  • Is my condition likely temporary or chronic?
  • What's the best course of action?
  • What are the alternatives to the primary approach you're suggesting?
  • Are there restrictions I need to follow?
  • Should I see a specialist?
  • Are there brochures or other printed material I can have? What websites do you recommend?

Don't hesitate to ask other questions.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you questions, such as:

  • Do your symptoms tend to occur at a particular time of day?
  • What types of shoes do you usually wear?
  • Are you a runner, or do you participate in any sports that involve running?
  • Do you have a physically demanding job?
  • Have you had problems with your feet before?
  • Do you feel pain anywhere besides your feet?
  • What, if anything, seems to improve your symptoms?
  • What, if anything, appears to worsen your symptoms?