Cancer care and COVID-19

Though the COVID-19 pandemic has created a lot of uncertainty, Mayo Clinic remains a place for hope and healing. And as always, we're delivering the care you need.

If you have a medical condition or concern, do not delay in seeking out treatment or medical advice, especially if it’s related to cancer. Mayo Clinic is taking precautions to ensure safe care during the pandemic, and we continue to welcome both new and existing patients for virtual and in-person care, including elective surgeries, in adherence with federal and state executive orders and guidance.

Don't delay cancer screening

The earlier cancer is detected, the better chances for successful treatment. Unfortunately, cancer doesn't rest during a pandemic. Recent research suggests that nearly 34,000 Americans will die of cancer because they delayed screening during the COVID-19 pandemic, making their cancers more difficult to treat when discovered. If you receive a recommendation for cancer screening or have questions about treatment, don't delay. Some appointments can be done virtually. Ask your physician for details, and stay on top of your cancer screening and treatment. Learn more about cancer treatment at Mayo Clinic during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Expedited cancer care

Mayo Clinic doctors are expediting certain cancer treatments, including surgery and radiation treatment for breast cancer. As always, a team of caregivers will coordinate your care to provide the right diagnosis and most-effective cancer care the first time. Learn more about cancer treatment at Mayo Clinic during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Cancer care innovation

The COVID-19 pandemic has created new challenges and opportunities across the world and in medical care. At Mayo Clinic, we have met those challenges and continue to innovate and research better options for people with cancer. Through this pandemic and beyond, our researchers will explore new treatments to make our cancer care stronger than ever. Learn more about cancer treatment at Mayo Clinic during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Feb. 18, 2021