After a successful kidney transplant, your new kidney will filter your blood, so you will no longer need dialysis. To prevent your body from rejecting your donor kidney, you'll require medications to suppress your immune system. You'll likely take these or similar drugs for the rest of your life. Because medications to suppress your immune system make your body more vulnerable to infection, your doctor may also prescribe antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal medications.

Kidney transplant survival rates

According to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network:

  • About 98 percent of people who receive a living-donor kidney transplant live for at least one year after their transplant surgery. About 90 percent live for at least five years.
  • About 94 percent of people who receive a deceased-donor kidney transplant live for at least one year after their transplant surgery. About 82 percent live for at least five years.

If your new kidney fails, you can resume dialysis or consider a second transplant. You may also choose to discontinue treatment. This important decision depends on your current health, your ability to withstand surgery and your expectations for maintaining a certain quality of life.

Nov. 02, 2011