Overview

During hip replacement, a surgeon removes the damaged sections of your hip joint and replaces them with parts usually constructed of metal, ceramic and very hard plastic. This artificial joint (prosthesis) helps reduce pain and improve function.

Also called total hip arthroplasty, hip replacement surgery may be an option for you if your hip pain interferes with daily activities and more-conservative treatments haven't helped or are no longer effective. Arthritis damage is the most common reason to need hip replacement.

Mayo Clinic's approach

April 22, 2017
References
  1. Hip replacement. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. http://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/hip_replacement. Accessed Nov. 8, 2016.
  2. Erens GA, et al. Total hip arthroplasty. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 8, 2016.
  3. Total hip replacement. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00377. Accessed Nov. 8, 2016.
  4. AskMayoExpert. Hip replacement. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  5. Erens GA, et al. Complications of total hip arthroplasty. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 8, 2016.
  6. Minimally invasive total hip replacement. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00404. Accessed Nov. 8, 2016.
  7. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. Total hip replacement surgery. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.
  8. Spangehl MJ (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Phoenix/Scottsdale Ariz. Dec. 5, 2016.
  9. Nelson CW. Dr. Mark B. Coventry and total hip arthroplasty. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1996;71:328.
  10. Brown AY. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Oct. 12, 2016.