What you can expect

By Mayo Clinic Staff

A chemical peel is typically done in an office-based procedure room or outpatient surgical facility. Before the procedure, your doctor will clean your face and might cover your eyes with ointment, gauze, tape or goggles. He or she might also protect your hair.

Pain relief isn't typically needed for a light chemical peel.

If you're having a medium chemical peel, you might have the option of taking a sedative and a painkiller.

If you're having a deep chemical peel, your doctor will likely numb your skin with a local anesthetic and give you a sedative or use regional anesthesia — which numbs a certain part of your body.

During the procedure

During a light chemical peel:

  • Your doctor will use a brush, cotton ball, gauze or sponge to apply a chemical solution typically containing glycolic acid or salicylic acid. The treated skin will begin to whiten.
  • You might feel mild stinging while the chemical solution is on your skin — up to 10 minutes.
  • Your doctor will apply a neutralizing solution or wash treated skin to remove the chemical solution.

During a medium chemical peel:

  • Your doctor will use a cotton-tipped applicator or gauze to apply a chemical solution containing trichloroacetic acid, sometimes in combination with glycolic acid. The treated skin will begin to whiten.
  • After a few minutes, your doctor will apply cool compresses to soothe treated skin. You might also be given a hand-held fan to cool your skin. No neutralizing solution is needed, however.
  • You might feel stinging and burning for up to 20 minutes.

During a deep chemical peel:

  • You'll be given intravenous (IV) fluids and your heart rate will be closely monitored.
  • Your doctor will use a cotton-tipped applicator to apply carbolic acid (phenol) to your skin. Treated skin will begin to turn white or gray.
  • To limit your exposure to phenol, your doctor will do the procedure in portions at 10- to 20-minute intervals. A full-facial procedure might take 60 to 90 minutes.

After the procedure

After a chemical peel of any depth, follow your doctor's directions for cleansing, moisturizing and applying protective ointments to your skin.

After a light chemical peel, treated skin will be red, dry and mildly irritated — although these effects might be less noticeable with each repeat treatment. Your doctor might apply a protective ointment, such as petroleum jelly, to soothe the area. In some cases, a crust might form over treated skin as it begins to heal.

Treated areas develop new skin about three to seven days after a light chemical peel. New skin might temporarily be lighter or darker than normal.

After a medium chemical peel, treated skin will be red, tight and swollen. You'll feel stinging. Your doctor might apply a protective ointment, such as petroleum jelly, to soothe the area. Use ice packs for comfort and sleep in a semi-reclined position to reduce swelling.

You'll likely schedule a checkup 24 hours after treatment and another checkup two to three days after treatment so that your doctor can monitor healing.

As swelling decreases, treated skin will begin to form a crust and might darken or develop brown blotches. Treated areas develop new skin about five to seven days after a medium chemical peel, but redness might last for months.

After a deep chemical peel, you'll experience severe redness and swelling. You'll also feel burning and throbbing, and your eyelids might swell shut. Your doctor will apply a watertight dressing containing zinc oxide to treated skin. He or she might also prescribe painkillers. Sleep in a semi-reclined position to reduce swelling.

You'll likely schedule a checkup 24 or 48 hours after treatment so that your doctor can remove the dressing and clear away any yellowish liquid oozing from treated skin.

Treated areas will develop new skin within about two weeks after a deep chemical peel, although cysts or white spots might appear for several weeks and redness might last for months. Treated skin might become darker or lighter than normal or lose the ability to tan.

You might prefer to remain at home while you're healing from a chemical peel. Once new skin completely covers the treated area, you can use cosmetics to conceal any redness.

May. 30, 2012