Your emotions

Pregnancy might leave you feeling delighted, anxious, exhilarated and exhausted — sometimes all at once. Even if you're thrilled about being pregnant, a new baby adds emotional stress to your life.

It's natural to worry about your baby's health, your adjustment to parenthood and the financial demands of raising a child. If you're working, you might worry about how to balance the demands of family and career. You might also experience mood swings. What you're feeling is normal. Take care of yourself, and look to your loved ones for understanding and encouragement. If your mood changes become severe or intense, consult your health care provider for support.

Prenatal care

Whether you choose a family doctor, obstetrician, nurse-midwife or other pregnancy specialist, your health care provider will treat, educate and reassure you throughout your pregnancy.

Your first visit will focus on assessing your overall health, identifying any risk factors and determining your baby's gestational age. Your health care provider will ask detailed questions about your health history. Be honest. If you're uncomfortable discussing your health history in front of your partner, schedule a private consultation. Also expect to learn about first trimester screening for chromosomal abnormalities, including prenatal cell-free DNA screening.

After the first visit, you'll probably be asked to schedule checkups every four weeks. During these appointments, discuss any concerns or fears you might have about pregnancy, childbirth or life with a newborn. Remember, no question is silly or unimportant — and the answers can help you take care of yourself and your baby.

April 14, 2017 See more In-depth