Descripción general

Perspectiva general

Toxoplasmosis (tok-so-plaz-MOE-sis) is a disease that results from infection with the Toxoplasma gondii parasite, one of the world's most common parasites. Infection usually occurs by eating undercooked contaminated meat, exposure from infected cat feces, or mother-to-child transmission during pregnancy.

Toxoplasmosis may cause flu-like symptoms in some people, but most people affected never develop signs and symptoms. For infants born to infected mothers and for people with weakened immune systems, toxoplasmosis may cause serious complications.

If you're generally healthy, not pregnant, and have been diagnosed with toxoplasmosis, you probably won't need any treatment other than conservative management. If you're pregnant or have lowered immunity, you may need medical management to avoid severe complications. The best approach, though, is prevention.

July 15, 2017
References
  1. Parasites — Toxoplasmosis (toxoplasma infection). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/toxoplasmosis/. Accessed Jan. 31, 2017.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, et al. Diagnosis and management of foodborne illnesses: A primer for physicians and other health care professionals. MMWR. 2004;53:1. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5304a1.htm. Accessed Jan. 31, 2017.
  3. Guerina NG. Congenital toxoplasmosis: Clinical features and diagnosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 31, 2017.
  4. Guerina NG. Congenital toxoplasmosis: Treatment, outcome, and prevention. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 31, 2017.
  5. Gilbert R, et al. Toxoplasmosis and pregnancy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 31, 2017.
  6. Toxoplasmosis: Pregnant women. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/toxoplasmosis/gen_info/pregnant.html. Accessed Jan. 31, 2017.
  7. Toxoplasmosis: Immunocompromised persons. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/toxoplasmosis/ic.html. Accessed Jan. 31, 2017.