Precautions

Drug information provided by: Micromedex

It is important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to allow changes in your dose and to check for any unwanted effects.

Amantadine may cause some people to be agitated, irritable, or display other abnormal behaviors. It may also cause some people to have suicidal thoughts and tendencies or to become more depressed. If you, your child, or your caregiver notice any of these adverse effects, tell your doctor or your child's doctor right away.

Some people who have used this medicine had unusual changes in their behavior. Talk with your doctor right away if you start having problems with gambling or an increased interest in sex while using this medicine.

Drinking alcoholic beverages while taking this medicine may cause increased side effects, such as circulation problems, dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting, or confusion. Do not drink alcoholic beverages while you are taking this medicine.

This medicine may cause some people to become dizzy, confused, or lightheaded, or to have blurred vision or trouble concentrating. Make sure you know how you react to this medicine before you drive, use machines, or do anything else that could be dangerous if you are dizzy or are not alert or able to see well. If these reactions are especially bothersome, check with your doctor.

Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting may occur with this medicine, especially when you get up from a lying or sitting position suddenly. These symptoms are more likely to occur when you begin taking this medicine, or when the dose is increased. Getting up slowly may help. If this problem continues or gets worse, check with your doctor.

Patients with Parkinson's disease must be careful not to overdo physical activities when their condition improves and body movements become easier since injuries resulting from falls may occur. Such activities must be gradually increased to give your body time to adjust to a change in balance, circulation, and coordination.

Amantadine may cause dryness of the mouth, nose, and throat. For temporary relief of mouth dryness, use sugarless candy or gum, melt bits of ice in your mouth, or use a saliva substitute. However, if your mouth continues to feel dry for more than 2 weeks, check with your doctor or dentist. Continuing dryness of the mouth may increase the chance of dental disease, including tooth decay, gum disease, and fungus infections.

This medicine may cause purplish red, net-like, blotchy spots on the skin. This problem occurs more often in females and usually occurs on the legs and/or feet after this medicine has been taken regularly for a month or more. Although the blotchy spots may remain as long as you are taking this medicine, they usually go away gradually within 2 to 12 weeks after you stop taking the medicine. If you have any questions about this, check with your doctor.

Check with your doctor right away if you are having convulsions (seizures); difficulty with breathing; a fast heartbeat; a high fever; high or low blood pressure; increased sweating; loss of bladder control; severe muscle stiffness; unusually pale skin; or tiredness. These could be symptoms of a serious condition called neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS).

If you are using this medicine for Parkinson's disease, do not stop taking this medicine suddenly without first checking with your doctor. Your doctor may want you to gradually reduce the amount you are using before stopping it completely.

If you are using this medicine for Parkinson's disease, it is important that your doctor check your skin regularly for signs of a skin cancer called melanoma. If you notice any unusual red, brown, or black spots on your skin, talk to your doctor right away.

If your Parkinson's symptoms do not improve within a few days, if they become worse, or if this medicine appears less effective after a few weeks, check with your doctor.