Preparing for your appointment

What you can do

  • Write down your symptoms, including any that may seem unrelated to your heart.
  • Make a list of all your medications, vitamins or supplements.
  • Write down your key medical information, including other diagnosed conditions.
  • Write down key personal information, including any recent changes or stressors in your life.
  • Write down questions to ask your doctor.

Questions to ask your doctor

  • What's the most likely cause of my symptoms?
  • What kinds of tests do I need?
  • What treatments can help?
  • What risks does my heart condition create?
  • How often will I need follow-up appointments?
  • Do I need to restrict my activities?
  • How will other conditions that I have or medications I take affect my heart problem?

In addition to the questions that you've prepared to ask your doctor, don't hesitate to ask questions during your appointment.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions. Being ready to answer them may make time to go over points you want to spend more time on. Your doctor might ask:

  • When did you first begin experiencing symptoms? How severe are they?
  • How often have you experienced a fast heartbeat?
  • How long have the episodes lasted?
  • Does anything such as exercise, stress or caffeine seem to trigger or worsen the episodes?
  • Do you have a family history of heart disease?
Nov. 17, 2016
References
  1. Di Biase L, et al. Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis of the WPW syndrome. http://www.uptodate.com. Accessed Aug. 16, 2016.
  2. Bonow RO, et al., eds. Atrial fibrillation: Clinical features, mechanisms, and management. In: Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  3. Di Biase L, et al. Treatment of symptomatic arrhythmias associated with the WPW syndrome. http://www.uptodate.com. Accessed Aug. 16, 2016.
  4. Dubin AM. Management of supraventriuclar tachycardia in children. http://www.uptodate.com. Accessed Aug. 16, 2016.
  5. Dubin AM. Supraventriuclar tachycardia in children: AV reentrant tachycardia (including WPW) and AV nodal reentrant tachycardia. http://www.uptodate.com. Accessed Aug. 16, 2016.
  6. AskMayoExpert. Supraventricular tachycardia. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  7. Ferri FF. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2017. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Aug. 15, 2013.
  8. Kliegman RM, et al. Disturbances of rate and rhythm of the heart. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  9. Bonow RO, et al., eds. Therapy for cardiac arrhythmias. In: Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  10. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. June 13, 2016.
  11. Bengali R, et al. Perioperative management of the WPW syndrome. Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia. 2014;28:1375.