Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome care at Mayo Clinic

Your Mayo Clinic care team

Mayo Clinic's WPW syndrome team includes doctors trained in heart diseases (cardiologists), heart rhythm disorders (electrophysiologists), cardiovascular surgery and other areas who work together to provide exactly the care you need. Specialists in the Heart Rhythm Clinic and Electrophysiology Laboratory are frequently involved in care.

Doctors trained in treating children with heart conditions (pediatric cardiologists) at Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota have experience evaluating and treating children with WPW syndrome and other heart conditions. Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota also offers care for children with WPW syndrome and other heart conditions in the Mayo Eugenio Litta Children's Hospital.

Having all of this subspecialized expertise in a single place, focused on you, means that you're not just getting one opinion — care is discussed among the team, appointments are scheduled in coordination, and highly specialized WPW syndrome experts are all working together to determine what's best for you or your child.

This collaborative approach means doctors can often evaluate you and develop a treatment plan within two or three days.

Advanced diagnosis and treatment

Specialists in the Electrophysiology Laboratory use advanced 3-D mapping and imaging systems to diagnose and treat arrhythmias. Testing is performed in state-of-the-art procedure rooms with advanced analysis and recording equipment.

With the latest research and laboratory facilities, Mayo Clinic experts are constantly seeking new medical knowledge and technologies to treat heart rhythm disorders.

Nationally recognized expertise

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., Mayo Clinic in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for heart and heart surgery by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic Children's Center in Rochester, Minn., is ranked among the Best Children's Hospitals for heart and heart surgery by U.S. News & World Report.

Expertise and rankings

  • Experience. Mayo Clinic doctors evaluate and treat more than 300 people with WPW syndrome each year. Incorrect treatment can be not only ineffective but also can cause your condition to worsen. As a leading center for cardiac medicine, Mayo Clinic has specialists with the skills and experience to diagnose and treat this rare condition in people of all ages.
  • Teamwork. Mayo Clinic cardiologists, cardiac surgeons and others work together to diagnose and treat adults and children with WPW syndrome. Pediatric cardiologists at Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota may be involved in diagnosing and treating children with WPW syndrome. Specialists in the Heart Rhythm Clinic and Electrophysiology Laboratory are frequently involved in care.
  • The latest techniques and technology. Mayo Clinic doctors use advanced cardiac catheterization techniques to treat WPW syndrome. Mayo Clinic pioneered the use of catheter-based therapies to repair congenital heart defects in children and adults.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., Mayo Clinic in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for heart and heart surgery by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic Children's Center in Rochester, Minn., is ranked among the Best Children's Hospitals for heart and heart surgery by U.S. News & World Report.

Learn more about Mayo Clinic's cardiac surgery and cardiovascular diseases departments' expertise and rankings.

Locations, travel and lodging

Mayo Clinic has major campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona; Jacksonville, Florida; and Rochester, Minnesota. The Mayo Clinic Health System has dozens of locations in several states.

For more information on visiting Mayo Clinic, choose your location below:

Costs and insurance

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people.

In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals, or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.

Learn more about appointments at Mayo Clinic.

Please contact your insurance company to verify medical coverage and to obtain any needed authorization prior to your visit. Often, your insurer's customer service number is printed on the back of your insurance card.

Aug. 09, 2017
References
  1. Di Biase L, et al. Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis of the WPW syndrome. http://www.uptodate.com. Accessed Aug. 16, 2016.
  2. Bonow RO, et al., eds. Atrial fibrillation: Clinical features, mechanisms, and management. In: Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  3. Di Biase L, et al. Treatment of symptomatic arrhythmias associated with the WPW syndrome. http://www.uptodate.com. Accessed Aug. 16, 2016.
  4. Dubin AM. Management of supraventriuclar tachycardia in children. http://www.uptodate.com. Accessed Aug. 16, 2016.
  5. Dubin AM. Supraventriuclar tachycardia in children: AV reentrant tachycardia (including WPW) and AV nodal reentrant tachycardia. http://www.uptodate.com. Accessed Aug. 16, 2016.
  6. AskMayoExpert. Supraventricular tachycardia. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  7. Ferri FF. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2017. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Aug. 15, 2013.
  8. Kliegman RM, et al. Disturbances of rate and rhythm of the heart. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  9. Bonow RO, et al., eds. Therapy for cardiac arrhythmias. In: Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  10. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. June 13, 2016.
  11. Bengali R, et al. Perioperative management of the WPW syndrome. Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia. 2014;28:1375.