Overview

An undescended testicle (cryptorchidism) is a testicle that hasn't moved into its proper position in the bag of skin hanging below the penis (scrotum) before birth. Usually just one testicle is affected, but about 10 percent of the time both testicles are undescended.

An undescended testicle is uncommon in general, but common among baby boys born prematurely.

The vast majority of the time, the undescended testicle moves into the proper position on its own, within the first few months of life. If your son has an undescended testicle that doesn't correct itself, surgery can relocate the testicle into the scrotum.

Undescended testicle care at Mayo Clinic

April 09, 2016
References
  1. Ferri FF. Cryptorchidism. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2016. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 9, 2016.
  2. Cooper CS, et al. Undescended testes (cryptorchidism) in children: Clinical features and evaluation. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 9, 2016.
  3. Longo DL, et al. Disorders of the testes and male reproductive system. In: Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 18th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2012. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Feb. 9, 2016.
  4. Evaluation and treatment of cryptorchidism: AUA guideline. Lanthicum, Md.: American Urological Association. https://www.auanet.org/education/guidelines/cryptorchidism.cfm. Accessed Feb. 9, 2016.
  5. Cooper CS, et al. Undescended testes (cryptorchidism) in children: Overview of management. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 9, 2016.
  6. Doherty GM, et al., eds. Pediatric surgery. In: Current Diagnosis & Treatment: Surgery. 14th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2015. http://accessmedicine.com. Accessed Feb. 9, 2016.