Self-management

You can do a number of things on your own to reduce sweating and body odor. The following suggestions may help:

  • Bathe daily. Regular bathing, especially with an antibacterial soap, reduces the growth of bacteria on your skin.
  • Choose clothing to suit your activity. For daily wear, choose natural fabrics, such as cotton, wool and silk. These allow your skin to breathe. For exercise wear, you might prefer synthetic fabrics developed to wick moisture away from your skin.
  • Try relaxation techniques. Consider relaxation techniques, such as yoga, meditation or biofeedback. These practices can teach you to control the stress that triggers perspiration.
  • Change your diet. Caffeinated beverages and spicy or strong-smelling foods may make you sweat more or have stronger body odor than usual. Eliminating these foods may help.
Feb. 14, 2017
References
  1. Goldsmith LA, et al., eds. Biology of eccrine and apocrine glands. In: Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine. 8th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2012. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed July 6, 2016.
  2. Perspiration. Natural Medicines. https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/. Accessed July 7, 2016.
  3. Kanlayavattanakul M, et al. Body malodours and their topical treatment agents. International Journal of Cosmetic Science. 2011;33:298.
  4. Shirasu M, et al. The scent of disease: Volatile organic compounds of the human body related to disease and disorder. Journal of Biochemistry. 2011;150:257.
  5. Hyperhidrosis. American Osteopathic College of Dermatology. http://aocd.site-ym.com/?page=Hyperhidrosis. Accessed July 6, 2016.
  6. Smith CC, et al. Primary focal hyperhidrosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed July 6, 2016.