Diagnosis

Tests and procedures used to diagnose squamous cell carcinoma of the skin include:

  • Physical exam. Your doctor will ask questions about your health history and examine your skin to look for signs of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin.
  • Removing a sample of tissue for testing. To confirm a squamous cell carcinoma of the skin diagnosis, your doctor will use a tool to cut away some or all of the suspicious skin lesion (biopsy). What type of skin biopsy you undergo depends on your particular situation. The tissue is sent to a laboratory for examination.

Treatment

Most squamous cell carcinomas of the skin can be completely removed with relatively minor surgery or occasionally with a topical medication. Which squamous cell carcinoma of the skin treatments are best for you depends on the size, location and aggressiveness of the tumor, as well as your own preferences.

Treatments may include:

  • Electrodesiccation and curettage (ED and C). ED and C treatment involves removing the surface of the skin cancer with a scraping instrument (curet) and then searing the base of the cancer with an electric needle. This treatment is often used for very small squamous cell cancers of the skin.
  • Curettage and cryotherapy. Similar to the ED and C procedure, after the tumor removal and curettage, the base and edges of the biopsy site are treated with liquid nitrogen.
  • Laser therapy. An intense beam of light vaporizes growths, usually with little damage to surrounding tissue and with a reduced risk of bleeding, swelling and scarring. Laser treatment may be an option for very superficial skin lesions.
  • Freezing. This treatment involves freezing cancer cells with liquid nitrogen (cryosurgery). It may be an option for treating superficial skin lesions.
  • Photodynamic therapy. Photodynamic therapy combines photosensitizing drugs and light to treat superficial skin cancers. During photodynamic therapy, a liquid drug that makes the cancer cells sensitive to light is applied to the skin. Later, a light that destroys the skin cancer cells is shined on the area.
  • Medicated creams or lotions. For very superficial cancers, you may apply creams or lotions containing anti-cancer medications directly to your skin.
  • Simple excision. In this procedure, your doctor cuts out the cancerous tissue and a surrounding margin of healthy skin. Your doctor may recommend removing additional normal skin around the tumor in some cases (wide excision). To minimize scarring, especially on your face, consult a doctor skilled in skin reconstruction.
  • Mohs surgery. During Mohs surgery, your doctor removes the cancer layer by layer, examining each layer under the microscope until no abnormal cells remain. This allows the surgeon to be certain the entire growth is removed and avoid taking an excessive amount of surrounding healthy skin.
  • Radiation therapy. Radiation therapy uses high-energy beams, such as X-rays, to kill cancer cells. This may be an option for treating deeper tumors, those that have a risk of returning after surgery and tumors in people who can't undergo surgery.

Clinical trials

Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this disease.

Preparing for your appointment

If you have a skin wound or lesion that concerns you, make an appointment with your doctor. You may be referred to a doctor who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of skin conditions (dermatologist).

If you've already had skin cancer, you have an increased risk of a second cancer. Talk with your dermatologist about how often you should have a skin examination to look for signs of another skin cancer.

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment, and what to expect from your doctor.

What you can do

  • Write down your medical history, including other conditions for which you've been treated. Be sure to include any radiation therapy you may have received, even years ago.
  • Make a list of your medications and natural remedies. Include any prescription or over-the-counter medications, vitamins, supplements, or herbal remedies that you're taking.
  • Write down questions to ask your doctor. Creating your list of questions in advance can help you make the most of your time with your doctor.
  • Find a family member or friend who can join you for your appointment. Although skin cancer is usually highly treatable, just hearing the word "cancer" can make it difficult to focus on what the doctor says next. Take someone along who can help you remember the information.

Below are some basic questions to ask your doctor about squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. If any additional questions occur to you during your visit, don't hesitate to ask.

  • Do I have skin cancer? What kind?
  • How is this type of skin cancer different from other types?
  • Is this type of cancer likely to spread?
  • Has my cancer spread?
  • What treatment approach do you recommend?
  • What are the possible side effects of this treatment?
  • Will I have a scar after treatment?
  • Am I at risk of this condition recurring?
  • Am I at risk of other types of skin cancer?
  • What can I do to prevent skin cancer?
  • How often will I need follow-up visits after I finish treatment?
  • Are there brochures or other printed material that I can take with me? What websites do you recommend?

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions. Being ready to answer them may reserve time to go over points you want to spend more time on. Your doctor may ask:

  • When did you first notice this skin growth or lesion?
  • Has it grown significantly since you first found it?
  • Is the growth or lesion painful?
  • Do you have any other growths or lesions that concern you?
  • Have you had a previous skin cancer?
  • How much exposure to the sun or tanning beds did you have as a child?
  • How much exposure to the sun or tanning beds do you have now?
  • Are you currently taking any medications?
  • Are you currently or have you previously used herbal remedies?
  • Have you ever received radiation therapy for another medical condition?
  • Have you ever taken medications that suppress your immune system?
  • What other significant medical conditions have you been treated for, including in your childhood?
  • Do you or did you smoke? How much?
  • Do you now or have you ever had a job that may have exposed you to pesticides or herbicides?
  • Do you now or have you ever relied on well water as your primary water source?
  • Do you take precautions to stay safe in the sun, such as avoiding midday sun and using sunscreen?
  • Do you examine your own skin on a regular basis?

Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin care at Mayo Clinic

Aug. 23, 2017
References
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  7. Squamous cell skin cancer. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/s_guidelines. Accessed Jan. 3, 2016.
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