Solitary fibrous tumors are rare growths of soft tissue cells that can form nearly anywhere in the body.

Solitary fibrous tumors most often occur in the lining around the outside of the lungs (pleural solitary fibrous tumors). Solitary fibrous tumors have also been found in the head and neck, breast, kidney, prostate, spinal cord, and other sites.

Most solitary fibrous tumors are noncancerous (benign), but in rare cases, solitary fibrous tumors can be cancerous (malignant). Solitary fibrous tumors tend to grow slowly and may not cause signs and symptoms until they become very large.

Solitary fibrous tumors care at Mayo Clinic

Oct. 14, 2016
  1. Folpe AL, et al. Tumor of perivascular cells. In: Bone and Soft Tissue Pathology. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2010.
  2. Demicco EG, et al. Solitary fibrous tumor. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 27, 2016.
  3. Jakob M. Malignant solitary fibrous tumor involving the liver. World Journal of Gastroenterology. 2013;19:3354.
  4. Keraliya AR, et al. Solitary fibrous tumors — 2016 imaging update. Radiologic Clinics of North America. 2016;54:565.
  5. Demicco EG, et al. Solitary fibrous tumor: A clinicopathological study of 110 cases and proposed risk assessment model. Modern Pathology. 2012;25:1298.
  6. Devito N, et al. Clinical characteristics and outcomes for solitary fibrous tumor (SFT): A single center experience. PLoS One. 2015;10:1.
  7. Levard A, et al. Outcome of patients with advanced solitary fibrous tumors: The Centre Léon Bérard experience. BMC Cancer. 2013;13:109.