Treatment of seborrheic keratoses usually isn't necessary. You may want them removed if they become irritated, if they bleed because your clothing rubs against them, or if you simply don't like how they look or feel.

Your doctor can remove seborrheic keratoses using several methods, including:

  • Freezing with liquid nitrogen (cryosurgery). Cryosurgery can be an effective way to remove seborrheic keratoses. It doesn't always work on raised growths, and it may lighten treated skin.
  • Scraping the skin's surface with a special instrument (curettage). Sometimes curettage is used along with cryosurgery to treat thinner or flat growths. It may be used with electrocautery.
  • Burning with an electric current (electrocautery). Electrocautery can be effective in removing seborrheic keratoses. It can be used alone or with curettage. This procedure can leave scars if it's not done properly, and it may take longer than other removal methods.
  • Vaporizing the growth with a laser (ablation). Different types of laser treatments are available to treat seborrheic keratoses.
Oct. 13, 2016
  1. Seborrheic keratosis. American Academy of Dermatology. Accessed June 16, 2016.
  2. Seborrheic keratoses. American Osteopathic College of Dermatology. Accessed June 17, 2016.
  3. Roh NK, et al. Clinical and histopathological investigation of seborrheic keratosis. Annals of Dermatology. 2016;28:152.
  4. Goldstein BG, et al. Overview of benign lesions of the skin. Accessed June 17, 2016.
  5. Phulari RGS, et al. Seborrheic keratosis. Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology. 2014;18:327.
  6. Goldsmith LA, et al., eds. Benign neoplasms and hyperplasias. In: Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine. 8th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2012. Accessed June 18, 2016.