Preparing for your appointment

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Make an appointment with your family doctor or pediatrician if you or your child has signs and symptoms common to scabies.

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment, and know what to expect from your doctor.

Information to gather in advance

  • List any signs or symptoms you or your child has had, and for how long.
  • List any possible sources of infection, such as other family members who have had a visible or itchy rash.
  • Write down key medical information, including any other health problems and the names of any medications you or your child is taking.
  • Write down questions you want to be sure to ask your doctor.

Below are some basic questions to ask your doctor about scabies.

  • What is the most likely cause of these signs and symptoms?
  • Are there any other possible causes?
  • What treatment approach do you recommend?
  • How soon do you expect symptoms to improve with treatment?
  • When will you see me or my child to determine whether the treatment you've recommended is working?
  • Are there any home remedies or self-care steps that could help relieve symptoms?
  • Am I or my child contagious? For how long?
  • What steps should be taken to reduce the risk of infecting others?

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions. Being ready to answer them may reserve time to go over any points you want to talk about in-depth. Your doctor may ask:

  • What signs and symptoms have you noticed?
  • When did you first notice these signs and symptoms?
  • Have these signs and symptoms gotten worse over time?
  • If you or your child has a visible rash, what parts of the body are affected?
  • Has anyone else with whom you have frequent, close contact had a rash, an itch or both within the last several weeks?
  • Are you currently pregnant or nursing?
  • Are you or your child currently being treated or have you recently been treated for any other medical conditions?
  • What medications are you or your child currently taking, including prescription and over-the-counter drugs, vitamins and supplements?
  • Is your child in child care?

What you can do in the meantime

In the time leading up to your appointment, try at-home and over-the-counter (OTC) remedies to help reduce itching. Cool water, antihistamines and calamine lotion may provide some relief. Ask your doctor what OTC medications and lotions are safe for your baby or child.

Jul. 24, 2012