Overview

A ruptured eardrum — or tympanic membrane perforation as it's medically known — is a hole or tear in the thin tissue that separates your ear canal from your middle ear (eardrum).

A ruptured eardrum can result in hearing loss. A ruptured eardrum can also make your middle ear vulnerable to infections or injury.

A ruptured eardrum usually heals within a few weeks without treatment. Sometimes, however, a ruptured eardrum requires a procedure or surgical repair to heal.

Nov. 10, 2016
References
  1. Perforated eardrum. American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery. http://www.entnet.org/content/perforated-eardrum. Accessed Sept. 19, 2016.
  2. Evans AK, et al. Evaluation and management of middle ear trauma. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 19, 2016.
  3. Lalwani AK. Temporal bone trauma. In: Current Diagnosis & Treatment in Otolaryngology--Head & Neck Surgery. 3rd ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2012. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Sept. 19, 2016.
  4. Vernick DM. Ear barotrauma. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 19, 2016.
  5. Traumatic perforation of the tympanic membrane. Merck Manual Professional Version. https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/ear,-nose,-and-throat-disorders/middle-ear-and-tympanic-membrane-disorders/traumatic-perforation-of-the-tympanic-membrane. Accessed Sept. 20, 2016.