Diagnosis

Rotavirus is often diagnosed based on symptoms and a physical exam. A stool sample may be analyzed in a lab to confirm the diagnosis.

Feb. 18, 2016
References
  1. Vaccines and Immunizations: Rotavirus. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/rota.html. Accessed Dec. 29, 2015.
  2. Bennett JE, et al. Rotaviruses. In: Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Dec. 29, 2015.
  3. Rotavirus. World Health Organization. http://www.who.int/immunization/topics/rotavirus/en/. Accessed Dec. 29, 2015.
  4. Rotavirus. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/rotavirus/index.html. Accessed Dec. 29, 2015.
  5. Diarrhea. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/digestive-diseases/diarrhea/Pages/facts.aspx#children. Accessed Dec. 29, 2015.
  6. What to do in a medical emergency: Fever. American College of Emergency Physicians. http://www.emergencycareforyou.org/Emergency-101/Emergencies-A-Z/Fever/. Accessed Dec. 29, 2015.
  7. What to do in a medical emergency: Vomiting and diarrhea. American College of Emergency Physicians. http://www.emergencycareforyou.org/Emergency-101/Emergencies-A-Z/Vomiting-and-Diarrhea/. Accessed Dec. 29, 2015.
  8. Matson DO. Acute viral gastroenteritis in children in resource-rich countries: Management and prevention. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 30, 2015.
  9. Matson DO. Rotavirus vaccines for infants. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 30, 2015.