Overview

Neuroblastoma is a cancer that develops from immature nerve cells found in several areas of the body.

Neuroblastoma most commonly arises in and around the adrenal glands, which have similar origins to nerve cells and sit atop the kidneys. However, neuroblastoma can also develop in other areas of the abdomen and in the chest, neck and near the spine, where groups of nerve cells exist.

Neuroblastoma most commonly affects children age 5 or younger, though it may rarely occur in older children.

Some forms of neuroblastoma go away on their own, while others may require multiple treatments. Your child's neuroblastoma treatment options will depend on several factors.

Neuroblastoma care at Mayo Clinic

Dec. 04, 2015
References
  1. Kliegman RM, et al. Neuroblastoma. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 3, 2015.
  2. Irwin MS, et al. Neuroblastoma: Paradigm for precision medicine. Pediatric Clinics of North America. 2015;62:225.
  3. Niederhuber JE, et al., eds. Pediatric solid tumors. In: Abeloff's Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 3, 2015.
  4. Neuroblastoma treatment (PDQ). National Cancer Institute. http://www.cancer.gov/types/neuroblastoma/patient/neuroblastoma-treatment-pdq. Accessed Nov. 3, 2015.
  5. Wilson JS, et al. A systematic review of 131I-meta iodobenzylguanidine molecular radiotherapy for neuroblastoma. European Journal of Cancer. 2014;50:801.
  6. Radiation therapy for neuroblastoma. American Cancer Society. http://www.cancer.org/cancer/neuroblastoma/detailedguide/neuroblastoma-treating-radiation-therapy. Accessed Nov. 11, 2015.