People at risk of long QT syndrome include:

  • Children, teenagers and young adults with unexplained fainting, unexplained near drownings or other accidents, unexplained seizures, or a history of cardiac arrest
  • Family members of children, teenagers and young adults with unexplained fainting, unexplained near drownings or other accidents, unexplained seizures, or a history of cardiac arrest
  • First-degree relatives of people with known long QT syndrome
  • People taking medications known to cause prolonged Q-T intervals
  • People with low potassium, magnesium or calcium blood levels — such as those with the eating disorder anorexia nervosa

Long QT syndrome often goes undiagnosed or is misdiagnosed as a seizure disorder, such as epilepsy. However, long QT syndrome may be responsible for some otherwise unexplained deaths in children and young adults. For example, an unexplained drowning of a young person may be the first clue to inherited long QT syndrome in a family.

Apr. 20, 2012

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