Long QT syndrome care at Mayo Clinic

Your Mayo Clinic care team

Mayo Clinic has one of the largest dedicated long QT syndrome specialty clinics in the nation. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in heart conditions (cardiologists), doctors trained in treating children with heart conditions (pediatric cardiologists), heart rhythm specialists (electrophysiologists) and heart surgeons (cardiovascular surgeons) work together as a team to provide coordinated, comprehensive care for people who have long QT syndrome.

Pediatric and genetic cardiologists at Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota have extensive experience caring for children and adults who have long QT syndrome and other heart conditions.

Individualized approach

Doctors at Mayo Clinic provide care for you as a whole person. Doctors take the time to get to know you and work with you to provide exactly the care you need. Mayo doctors evaluate each person's condition and establish an individualized treatment program.

Treatment expertise

A team of doctors with expertise and training in long QT syndrome work together to treat both adults and children with long QT syndrome in the Long QT Syndrome/Genetic Heart Rhythm Clinic at Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota.

Doctors trained and experienced in treating heart rhythm conditions treat adults with long QT syndrome and other heart rhythm conditions at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Mayo doctors have experience performing minimally invasive, left cardiac sympathetic denervation surgeries to treat long QT syndrome.

Advanced diagnosis and treatment

At Mayo Clinic, you will have access to the latest imaging and diagnostic tools. Mayo Clinic experts work in state-of-the-art research and laboratory facilities, seeking new medical knowledge and individual-driven innovations. Their commitment to research means you may able to participate in clinical trials.

Treatment for inherited long QT syndrome can involve medications, medical devices and surgery.

Research

Mayo doctors in the Windland Smith Rice Sudden Death Genomics Laboratory at Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota actively conducts research in genetics, risks, causes, diagnostic tests and treatment options for long QT syndrome and other causes of sudden death.

Expertise and rankings

Experience

Mayo Clinic cardiologists, cardiac surgeons and others have extensive experience and expertise in diagnosing and treating people with all types of heart conditions, including long QT syndrome. Mayo doctors evaluate and treat more than 1,000 people with long QT syndrome each year.

The latest techniques and technology

Doctors in Mayo Clinic's Cardiovascular Research Center are focused on developing diagnostic tests and innovative treatments for people with cardiovascular disease.

In Mayo Clinic's Heart Rhythm Clinic, doctors work together as a multidisciplinary team to evaluate and treat people with a wide variety of heart rhythm disorders.

Nationally recognized expertise

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., Mayo Clinic in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for heart and heart surgery by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic Children's Center in Rochester, Minn., is ranked among the Best Children's Hospitals for heart and heart surgery by U.S. News & World Report.

With Mayo Clinic's emphasis on collaborative care, specialists at each of the campuses — Minnesota, Arizona and Florida — interact very closely with colleagues at the other campuses and the Mayo Clinic Health System.

Learn more about Mayo Clinic's cardiac surgery and cardiovascular diseases departments' expertise and rankings.

Locations, travel and lodging

Mayo Clinic has major campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona; Jacksonville, Florida; and Rochester, Minnesota. The Mayo Clinic Health System has dozens of locations in several states.

For more information on visiting Mayo Clinic, choose your location below:

Costs and insurance

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people.

In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals, or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.

Learn more about appointments at Mayo Clinic.

Please contact your insurance company to verify medical coverage and to obtain any needed authorization prior to your visit. Often, your insurer's customer service number is printed on the back of your insurance card.

July 22, 2017
References
  1. What is long QT syndrome? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/qt. Accessed Feb. 18, 2017.
  2. Conduction disorders. American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/Arrhythmia/AboutArrhythmia/Conduction-Disorders_UCM_302046_Article.jsp#.WLhwehiZOu4. Accessed March 2, 2017.
  3. Seslar SP, et al. Clinical features of congenital long QT syndrome. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 15, 2017.
  4. Zimetbaum PJ, et al. Genetics of congenital and acquired long QT syndrome. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 15, 2017.
  5. Berul CI, et al. Acquired long QT syndrome. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 15, 2017.
  6. AskMayoExpert. Screening (adult). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2017.
  7. AskMayoExpert. Significance of a long QT interval (adult). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2017.
  8. What is the heart? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/hhw. Accessed Feb. 18, 2017.
  9. AskMayoExpert. Prolonged QT interval: Signs and symptoms (adult). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2017.
  10. Arrhythmia. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/arr/types. Accessed Feb. 18, 2017.
  11. Seslar SP, et al. Diagnosis of congenital long QT syndrome. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 18, 2017.
  12. Ferri FF. Prolonged Q-T interval syndrome. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2016. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 15, 2017.
  13. Zimetbaum PJ, et al. Prognosis and management of congenital long QT syndrome. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 15, 2017.
  14. Ackerman JP, et al. The promise and peril of precision medicine: Phenotyping still matters most. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2016;91:1606.
  15. Aziz PF, et al. Sports participation in genotype positive children with long QT syndrome. Clinical Electrophysiology. 2015;1:62.
  16. Riggin ER. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 10, 2017.
  17. Schwartz PJ, et al. Management of survivors of cardiac arrest — The importance of genetic investigation. Nature Reviews: Cardiology. 2016;13:560.
  18. Genetic testing. Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndromes Foundation. http://www.sads.org/living-with-sads/Insurance/Genetic-Testing#.VfB_G9iFODZ. Accessed Feb. 15, 2017.
  19. Mazzanti A, et al. Gene-specific therapy with mexiletine reduces arrhythmic events in patients with long QT syndrome type 3. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2016;67:1053.
  20. Fish Oil. Natural Medicines. https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/databases/food,-herbs-supplements/professional.aspx?productid=993. Accessed Feb. 21, 2017.
  21. Schwartz PJ, et al. Predicting the unpredictable: Drug-induced QT prolongation and torsades de pointes. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2016;67:1639.
  22. Loar RW, et al. Sudden cardiac arrest during sex in patients with either catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia or long-QT syndrome: A rare but shocking experience. Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology. 2015;26:300.
  23. Garg L, et al. The influence of pregnancy in patients with congenital long QT syndrome. Cardiology in Review. In press. Accessed Feb. 20, 2017.
  24. Ackerman MJ (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Mar. 13, 2017.
  25. Priori SG, et al. HRS/EHRA/APHRS Expert Consensus Statement on the Diagnosis and Management of Patients with Inherited Primary Arrhythmia Syndromes. Heart Rhythm. 2013;10:1932.
  26. Priori SG, et al. 2015 ESC Guidelines for the management of patients with ventricular arrhythmias and the prevention of sudden cardiac death. European Heart Journal. 2015;36:2793.
  27. Ackerman MJ, et al. Beta-blocker therapy for long QT syndrome and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia: Are all beta-blockers equivalent? Heart Rhythm. 2017;14:e41.
  28. Fernández-Falgueras A, et al. Cardiac channelopathies and sudden death: Recent clinical and genetic advances. Biology. 2017;6:7.
  29. Giudicessi JR, et al. Calcium revisited: New insights into the molecular basis of long-QT syndrome. Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. 2016;9:e002480.
  30. Collura CA, et al. Left cardiac sympathetic denervation for the treatment of long QT syndrome and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia using video-assisted thoracic surgery. Heart Rhythm. 2009;6:752.
  31. Gaba P, et al. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator explantation for overdiagnosed or overtreated congenital long QT syndrome. Heart Rhythm. 2016;13:879.
  32. Desimone CV, et al. Effects on repolarization using dynamic QT interval monitoring in long-QT patients following left cardiac sympathetic denervation. Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology. 2015;26:434.
  33. Johnson JN, et al. Competitive sports participation in athletes with congenital long QT syndrome. JAMA. 2012;308:765.
  34. Johnson JN, et al. Return to play? Athletes with congenital long QT syndrome. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013;47:28.
  35. Antiel RM, et al. Quality of life after videoscopic left cardiac sympathetic denervation in patients with potentially life-threatening cardiac channelopathies/cardiomyopathies. Heart Rhythm. 2016;13:62.
  36. Sriram CS, et al. Malignant bileaflet mitral valve prolapse syndrome in patients with otherwise idiopathic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2013;62:222.

Connect with others

News, connections and conversations for your health

Recent posts