Overview

Lazy eye (amblyopia) is reduced vision in one eye caused by abnormal visual development early in life. The weaker — or lazy — eye often wanders inward or outward.

Amblyopia generally develops from birth up to age 7 years. It is the leading cause of decreased vision in one eye among children. Rarely, lazy eye affects both eyes.

Early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent long-term problems with your child's vision. Lazy eye can usually be corrected with glasses or contact lenses, or eye patches. Sometimes surgery is required.

May 03, 2016
References
  1. Coats DK, et al. Amblyopia in children: Classification, screening, and evaluation. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 2, 2016.
  2. AskMayoExpert. Amblyopia. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014.
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  5. Kliegman RM, et al. Disorders of vision. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed March 15, 2016.
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