Overview

Hot flashes are sudden feelings of warmth, which are usually most intense over the face, neck and chest. Your skin might redden, as if you're blushing. Hot flashes can also cause sweating, and if you lose too much body heat, you might feel chilled afterward.

Although other medical conditions can cause them, hot flashes most commonly are due to menopause — the time when menstrual periods become irregular and eventually stop. In fact, hot flashes are the most common symptom of the menopausal transition.

How often hot flashes occur varies among women and can range from a few a week to several an hour. There are a variety of treatments for particularly bothersome hot flashes.

May 18, 2017
References
  1. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) Committee on Practice Bulletins — Gynecology. ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 141: Management of menopausal symptoms. Obstetrics & Gynecology. 2014;123:202.
  2. Santen RJ, et al. Menopausal hot flashes. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 23, 2017.
  3. Nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms: 2015 position statement of the North American Menopause Society. Menopause. 2015;22:1155.
  4. Menopause: Time for a change. National Institute on Aging. https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/publication/menopause-time-change/introduction. Accessed Feb. 26, 2017.
  5. Menopausal symptoms: In depth. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. http://nccam.nih.gov/health/menopause/menopausesymptoms. Accessed Feb. 27, 2017.
  6. Sood R (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Accessed March 8, 2017.