Treatments and drugs

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Most cases of gynecomastia regress over time without treatment. However, if gynecomastia is caused by an underlying condition, such as hypogonadism, malnutrition or cirrhosis, that condition may need treatment. If you're taking medications that can cause gynecomastia, your doctor may recommend stopping them or substituting another medication.

In adolescents with no apparent cause of gynecomastia, the doctor may recommend periodic re-evaluations every three to six months to see if the condition improves on its own. Gynecomastia often goes away without treatment in less than two years. However, treatment may be necessary if gynecomastia doesn't improve on its own or if it causes significant pain, tenderness or embarrassment.

Medications

Medications used to treat breast cancer and other conditions, such as tamoxifen (Soltamox) and raloxifene (Evista), may be helpful for some men with gynecomastia. Although these medications are approved by the Food and Drug Administration, they have not been approved specifically for this use.

Surgery to remove excess breast tissue

If you still have significant bothersome breast enlargement despite initial treatment or observation, your doctor may advise surgery. Two gynecomastia surgery options are:

  • Liposuction. This surgery removes breast fat, but not the breast gland tissue itself.
  • Mastectomy. This type of surgery removes the breast gland tissue. The surgery is often done endoscopically, meaning only small incisions are used. This less invasive type of surgery involves less recovery time.
Jan. 02, 2014

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