Preparing for your appointment

You're likely to start by seeing your family doctor or gynecologist. However, you may be referred to a breast health specialist instead.

What you can do

To prepare for your appointment:

  • Take note of all your symptoms, even if they seem unrelated to the reason for which you scheduled the appointment.
  • Review key personal information, including major stresses or recent life changes.
  • Make a list of all medications, vitamins and supplements that you take.
  • Write down questions to ask, listing them in order of importance.

For galactorrhea, possible questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What's likely causing my symptoms?
  • Are there any other possible causes?
  • What kind of tests might I need?
  • What treatment approach do you recommend for me?
  • Is there a generic equivalent for the medicine you're prescribing me?
  • Are there any at-home remedies I might try?

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor may ask you questions, such as:

  • What color is your nipple discharge?
  • Does nipple discharge occur in one or both breasts?
  • Do you have other breast signs or symptoms, such as a lump or area of thickening?
  • Do you have breast pain?
  • How often do you perform breast self-exams?
  • Have you noticed any breast changes?
  • Are you pregnant or breast-feeding?
  • Do you still have regular menstrual periods?
  • Are you having trouble getting pregnant?
  • What medications do you take?
  • Do you have headaches or vision problems?

What you can do in the meantime

Until your appointment, follow these tips to deal with unwanted nipple discharge:

  • Avoid breast stimulation to reduce or stop nipple discharge. For instance, avoid stimulating the nipples during sexual activity. Don't wear clothing that causes a lot of friction on your nipples.
  • Use breast pads to absorb nipple discharge and prevent it from seeping through your clothing.
Jan. 04, 2016
References
  1. AskMayoExpert. Nipple discharge. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014.
  2. Ferri FF. Galactorrhea. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2015: 5 Books in 1. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 26, 2015.
  3. Golshan M, et al. Nipple discharge. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 6, 2015.
  4. Bope ET, et al. Hyperprolactinemia. In: Conn's Current Therapy 2015. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 6, 2015.
  5. Galactorrhea. First consult. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 6, 2015.
  6. AskMayoExpert. Prolactinoma. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014.
  7. Pruthi S (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Nov. 15, 2015.
  8. Rohren CH (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Nov. 13, 2015.