Departments and specialties

Mayo Clinic has one of the largest and most experienced practices in the United States, with campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Staff skilled in dozens of specialties work together to ensure quality care and successful recovery.

Departments that treat this condition

Areas that research this condition

Research

Mayo Clinic researchers are working to improve diagnosis and treatment of encephalitis. Specific efforts include laboratory studies of medications that might block the brain's inflammatory response to certain infections, clinical studies of predictors of outcome for people with HSV encephalitis and newly emerging tick-borne infections.

Researchers in the Mayo Clinic Neurological Infectious Disease program conduct ongoing studies of HSV encephalitis and West Nile virus.

Publications

See a list of publications on encephalitis by Mayo Clinic doctors on PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine.

Research Profiles

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Encephalitis care at Mayo Clinic

June 13, 2017
References
  1. Bennett JE, et al. Encephalitis. In: Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Jan. 24, 2017.
  2. Hardarson HS. Acute viral encephalitis in children: Clinical manifestations and diagnosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 31, 2017.
  3. Ferri FF. Encephalitis, acute viral. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2017. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Jan. 24, 2017.
  4. AskMayoExpert. Viral encephalitis. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  5. Gluckman SJ. Viral encephalitis in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 24, 2017.
  6. Meningitis and encephalitis fact sheet. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/Patient-Caregiver-Education/Fact-Sheets/Meningitis-and-Encephalitis-Fact-Sheet. Accessed Feb. 1, 2017.
  7. Dorsett M, et al. Diagnosis and treatment of central nervous system infections in the emergency department. Emergency Medical Clinics of North America. 2016;34:917.
  8. Patel H, et al. Long-term sequelae of West Nile virus-related illness: A systematic review. The Lancet Infections Diseases. 2015;15:951.
  9. Hardarson HS. Acute viral encephalitis in children: Treatment and prevention. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 31, 2017.
  10. Daroff RB, et al. Viral encephalitis and meningitis. In: Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 1, 2017.
  11. Zachary KC. Acyclovir: An overview. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 1, 2017.
  12. Breisch N. Prevention of arthropod and insect bites: Repellents and other measures. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 31, 2017.
  13. West Nile virus FAQ: Insect repellant use and safety. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/westnile/faq/repellent.html. Accessed Feb. 1, 2017.
  14. West Nile virus: Prevention & control. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/westnile/prevention/index.html. Accessed Feb. 1, 2017.
  15. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 24, 2017.
  16. Howe CL, et al. Neuroprotection mediated by inhibition of calpain during acute viral encephalitis. Scientific Reports. 2016;6:28699.
  17. Singh TD, et al. Predictors of outcome in HSV encephalitis. Journal of Neurology. 2016;263:277.
  18. Wormser GP, et al. Update and commentary on four emerging tick-borne infections. Infectious Disease Clinics of North America. 2015;29:371.