Expertise and rankings

Mayo Clinic's cardiovasular experts provide comprehensive care for more than 650 people with Eisenmenger syndrome each year.

  • Teamwork. Mayo Clinic doctors in many areas work together as a multidisciplinary team to provide coordinated, comprehensive care. Cardiologists, pediatric cardiologists, cardiovascular surgeons and other staff trained to diagnose and treat congenital heart disease work closely with specialists in other areas to provide coordinated, high-quality care. At Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota, staff in the Center for Congenital Heart Disease care for people who have congenital heart disease throughout their lives. Each Mayo Clinic location offers care for adults with congenital heart disease.
  • The latest techniques and technology. Cardiovascular experts at Mayo Clinic have access to cutting-edge technological advances, including ultrasound, angiogram, computerized tomography angiogram and magnetic resonance angiogram, to aid them in diagnosing Eisenmenger syndrome.
  • Research. Mayo Clinic doctors conduct research in new treatments for Eisenmenger syndrome and conduct clinical trials.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., is ranked among the Best Hospitals for heart and heart surgery by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic also ranks among the Best Children's Hospitals for heart and heart surgery.

Learn more about Mayo Clinic's cardiovascular diseases and cardiac surgery departments' expertise and rankings.

Jan. 26, 2016
References
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  3. Warnes CA, et al. ACC/AHA 2008 guidelines for the management of adults with congenital heart disease. Circulation. 2008;118:e714.
  4. Gatzoulis MA, et al., eds. Eisenmenger syndrome. In: Diagnosis and Management of Adult Congenital Heart Disease. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2011. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Oct. 15, 2015.
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  7. Opotowsky AR, et al. The exceptional and far-flung manifestations of heart failure in Eisenmenger syndrome. Heart Failure Clinics. 2014;177:340.
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