Departments and specialties

Mayo Clinic has one of the largest and most experienced practices in the United States, with campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Staff skilled in dozens of specialties work together to ensure quality care and successful recovery.

Departments that treat this condition

Areas that research this condition

Research

Mayo Clinic researchers have a distinguished history in researching dystonia and other movement disorders. Mayo Clinic neurologists have identified genes that cause dystonia, characterized dystonia in previously overlooked muscles and evaluated the effectiveness of Botox treatment. These researchers continue to work to improve diagnosis and treatment of dystonia.

The Neural Engineering Laboratory researches deep brain stimulation for treatment of movement disorders. The Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Laboratory conducts research on golfer's dystonia (yips) and other types of dystonia.

Read more about movement disorders research on the neurology research website and at the Udall Center of Excellence in Parkinson's Disease Research website.

Read about deep brain stimulation as a treatment option for dystonia and other movement disorders at Mayo Clinic.

Publications

See a list of publications about dystonia by Mayo Clinic doctors on PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine.

Dystonia care at Mayo Clinic

Nov. 25, 2015
References
  1. Comella C. Classification and evaluation of dystonia. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 30, 2015.
  2. Flint PW, ed. Neurologic disorders of the larynx. In: Cummings Otolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Sept. 30, 2015.
  3. Jinnah HA, et al. Diagnosis and treatment of dystonia. Neurologic Clinics. 2015;33:77.
  4. Comella C. Treatment of dystonia. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 30, 2015.
  5. Frontera WR, et al., eds. Cervical dystonia. In: Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Musculoskeletal Disorders, Pain, and Rehabilitation. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Sept. 30, 2015.
  6. Yanoff M, et al., eds. Essential blepharospasm. In: Ophthalmology. 4th ed. Edinburgh, U.K.: Mosby Elsevier;; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Sept. 30, 2015.
  7. Khan J, et al. Oromandibular dystonia: Differential diagnosis and management. Journal of the American Dental Association. 2015;146:690.
  8. AskMayoExpert. Cervical dystonia. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.
  9. Ferri FF. Neurology. In: Ferri's Practical Guide: Fast Facts for Patient Care. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Sept. 30, 2015.
  10. Prudenta CN, et al. Dystonia as a network disorder: What is the role of the cerebellum? Neuroscience. 2014;260:23.
  11. Dystonias fact sheet. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/dystonias/detail_dystonias.htm. Accessed Sept. 30, 2015.
  12. Mills KA, et al. Neuromodulation for dystonia: Target and patient selection. Neurosurgery Clinics of North America. 2014;25:59.
  13. Yoga. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. https://nccih.nih.gov/health/yoga. Accessed Sept. 30, 2015.
  14. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Sept. 18, 2015.